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A synthesis of qualitative research studies regarding the factors surrounding UK critical care trial infrastructure. / Pattison, Natalie; Arul, Nish; Connolly, Bronwen; O'Gara, Geraldine.

In: BMJ Open, 29.11.2019.

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@article{46956ef0e80d4bdb85ee7a5e0517c662,
title = "A synthesis of qualitative research studies regarding the factors surrounding UK critical care trial infrastructure",
abstract = "Conducting clinical trials in critical care is integral to improving patient care. Unique practical and ethical considerations exist in this patient population that make patient recruitment challenging, including narrow recruitment timeframes and obtaining patient consent often in time-critical situations. Units currently vary significantly in their ability to recruit according to infrastructure and level of research activity.Aim To identify variability in the research infrastructure of UK intensive care units (ICUs) and their ability to conduct research and recruit patients into clinical trials.DesignWe evaluated factors related to intensive care patient enrolment into clinical trials in the UK. This consisted of a qualitative synthesis carried out with two datasets of in-depth interviews (distinct participants across the two datasets) conducted with 27 intensive care consultants (n=9), research nurses (n=17) and trial coordinators (n=1) from 27 units across the UK. Primary and secondary analysis of two datasets (one dataset had been analysed previously) was undertaken in the thematic analysis.FindingsThe synthesis yielded an overarching core theme of Normalising Research, characterised by motivations for promoting research and fostering research-active cultures within resource constraints, with six themes under this to explain the factors influencing critical care research capacity: Organisational, Human, Study, Practical resources, Clinician, and Patient/family factors. There was a strong sense of integrating research in routine clinical practice, and recommendations are outlined.ConclusionsThe central and transferable tenet of Normalising Research advocates the importance of developing a culture where research is inclusive alongside clinical practice in routine patient care and is requisite for all healthcare individuals from organisational to direct patient contact level.Keywords: Qualitative synthesis; critical care trials; access to research; barriers; facilitators;normalising research",
author = "Natalie Pattison and Nish Arul and Bronwen Connolly and Geraldine O'Gara",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "29",
language = "English",
journal = "BMJ Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A synthesis of qualitative research studies regarding the factors surrounding UK critical care trial infrastructure

AU - Pattison, Natalie

AU - Arul, Nish

AU - Connolly, Bronwen

AU - O'Gara, Geraldine

PY - 2019/11/29

Y1 - 2019/11/29

N2 - Conducting clinical trials in critical care is integral to improving patient care. Unique practical and ethical considerations exist in this patient population that make patient recruitment challenging, including narrow recruitment timeframes and obtaining patient consent often in time-critical situations. Units currently vary significantly in their ability to recruit according to infrastructure and level of research activity.Aim To identify variability in the research infrastructure of UK intensive care units (ICUs) and their ability to conduct research and recruit patients into clinical trials.DesignWe evaluated factors related to intensive care patient enrolment into clinical trials in the UK. This consisted of a qualitative synthesis carried out with two datasets of in-depth interviews (distinct participants across the two datasets) conducted with 27 intensive care consultants (n=9), research nurses (n=17) and trial coordinators (n=1) from 27 units across the UK. Primary and secondary analysis of two datasets (one dataset had been analysed previously) was undertaken in the thematic analysis.FindingsThe synthesis yielded an overarching core theme of Normalising Research, characterised by motivations for promoting research and fostering research-active cultures within resource constraints, with six themes under this to explain the factors influencing critical care research capacity: Organisational, Human, Study, Practical resources, Clinician, and Patient/family factors. There was a strong sense of integrating research in routine clinical practice, and recommendations are outlined.ConclusionsThe central and transferable tenet of Normalising Research advocates the importance of developing a culture where research is inclusive alongside clinical practice in routine patient care and is requisite for all healthcare individuals from organisational to direct patient contact level.Keywords: Qualitative synthesis; critical care trials; access to research; barriers; facilitators;normalising research

AB - Conducting clinical trials in critical care is integral to improving patient care. Unique practical and ethical considerations exist in this patient population that make patient recruitment challenging, including narrow recruitment timeframes and obtaining patient consent often in time-critical situations. Units currently vary significantly in their ability to recruit according to infrastructure and level of research activity.Aim To identify variability in the research infrastructure of UK intensive care units (ICUs) and their ability to conduct research and recruit patients into clinical trials.DesignWe evaluated factors related to intensive care patient enrolment into clinical trials in the UK. This consisted of a qualitative synthesis carried out with two datasets of in-depth interviews (distinct participants across the two datasets) conducted with 27 intensive care consultants (n=9), research nurses (n=17) and trial coordinators (n=1) from 27 units across the UK. Primary and secondary analysis of two datasets (one dataset had been analysed previously) was undertaken in the thematic analysis.FindingsThe synthesis yielded an overarching core theme of Normalising Research, characterised by motivations for promoting research and fostering research-active cultures within resource constraints, with six themes under this to explain the factors influencing critical care research capacity: Organisational, Human, Study, Practical resources, Clinician, and Patient/family factors. There was a strong sense of integrating research in routine clinical practice, and recommendations are outlined.ConclusionsThe central and transferable tenet of Normalising Research advocates the importance of developing a culture where research is inclusive alongside clinical practice in routine patient care and is requisite for all healthcare individuals from organisational to direct patient contact level.Keywords: Qualitative synthesis; critical care trials; access to research; barriers; facilitators;normalising research

M3 - Article

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

ER -