University of Hertfordshire

  • Katherine M Livingstone
  • Carlos Celis-Morales
  • Jose Lara
  • Clara Woolhead
  • Clare B O'Donovan
  • Hannah Forster
  • Cyril Fm Marsaux
  • Anna L Macready
  • Santiago Navas-Carretero
  • Rodrigo San-Cristobal
  • Silvia Kolossa
  • Lydia Tsirigoti
  • Christina P Lambrinou
  • George Moschonis
  • Agnieszka Surwiłło
  • Christian A Drevon
  • Yannis Manios
  • Iwona Traczyk
  • Eileen R Gibney
  • Lorraine Brennan
  • Marianne C Walsh
  • Julie A Lovegrove
  • J Alfredo Martinez
  • Wim Hm Saris
  • Hannelore Daniel
  • Mike Gibney
  • John C Mathers
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Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
Pages (from-to)2141-2146
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Journal publication date1 Aug 2019
Volume22
Issue11
Early online date12 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Jun 2019

Abstract

Original text and corrections: ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3296, Abstract) Subjects: Adults aged 18-79 years (n 1480). CORRECTION Subjects: Adults aged 18-79 years at baseline (n 1480). ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3298, Results) Of the 5562 individuals who registered on the Food4Me website, 1607 were randomised into the study and a total of 1480 provided baseline data on dietary intakes(17). CORRECTION Of the 5562 individuals who registered on the Food4Me website, 1607 were randomised into the study. A total of 1480 participants provided baseline data on dietary intakes (15). Following exclusion of missing data for covariates the baseline sample was 1285. A total of 1147 participants provided complete follow up data. ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3300, Results) There were no significant differences in changes in HEI between clusters when PN was stratified by Level 1, Level 2 or Level 3 (data not shown). CORRECTION The results for when PN was stratified by L1, L2 or L3 are presented in Supplementary Table 5. For participants in L2, there were bigger improvements in HEI for participants in C4 compared with C1 (P <0.001) and in C3 and C2 compared with C1 (<0.05). For participants in L3, there were bigger improvements in HEI for participants in C4 compared with C1 and C2 (P<0.05) (Supplementary Table 5). There were no significant differences for participants in L1. ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3300, Results) Exclusion of participants with reported intakes more than 3 SD above or below the mean dietary intakes of whole grains, oily fish, red meat and fruit and vegetables revealed similar clusters (see online supplementary material, Supplemental Table 5).CORRECTION Exclusion of participants with reported intakes more than 3 SD above or below the mean dietary intakes of wholegrain, oily fish, red meat and fruit and vegetables revealed similar clusters (Supplementary Table 6). ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3302, Discussion) We observed that individuals in the cluster where the fewest recommendations were met (C4) reported the biggest improvement in HEI following PN intervention but there were no differences between clusters in response to conventional, non-personalised dietary advice. CORRECTION We observed that individuals in the cluster where the fewest recommendations were met (C4) reported the biggest improvement in HEI following PN intervention. ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3302, Discussion) Fig. 1 Changes from baseline to month 6 in Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI) score by cluster of adherence to dietary recommendations at baseline among adults aged 18-79 years (n 1480), Food4Me study. CORRECTION Figure 1 Changes from baseline to month 6 in Healthy Eating Index by clusters of adherence to recommendations at baseline among adults aged 18-79 years (n 1,147), Food4Me study. ORIGINAL TEXT (page 3300, Results) Table needed CORRECTION Table 1 Food and nutrient and intakes by participants by clusters of adherence to recommendations at baseline among adults aged 18-79 years (n 1285), Food4Me study (Table Presented).

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