University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Designing touchless gestural interactions for public displays in-the-wild

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman-Computer Interaction
Subtitle of host publicationInteraction Technologies - 17th International Conference, HCI International 2015, Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages24-34
Number of pages11
Volume9170
ISBN (Print)9783319209159
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Jul 2015
Event17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: 2 Aug 20157 Aug 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9170
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period2/08/157/08/15

Abstract

Public displays, typically equipped with touchscreens, are used for interactions in public spaces, such as streets or fairs. Currently low-cost visual sensing technologies, such as Kinect-like devices and high quality cameras, allow to easily implement touchless interfaces. Nevertheless, the arising interactions have not yet been fully investigated for public displays in-the-wild (i.e. in appropriate social contexts where public displays are typically deployed). Different audiences, cultures and social settings strongly affect users and their interactions. Besides gestures for public displays must be guessable to be easy to use for a wide audience. Issues like these could be solved with user-centered design: gestures must be chosen by users in different social settings, and then selected to be resilient to cultural bias and provide a good level of guessability. Therefore the main challenge is to define touchless gestures in-the-wild by using novel UCD methods applied out of controlled environments, and evaluating their effectiveness.

Notes

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

ID: 13232283