University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

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Designing Worlds : National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization. / Lees-Maffei, Grace (Editor); Fallan, Kjetil (Editor).

New York and Oxford : Berghahn Books, 2016. 281 p. (Making Sense of History; Vol. 24).

Research output: Book/ReportAnthology

Harvard

Lees-Maffei, G & Fallan, K (eds) 2016, Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization. Making Sense of History, vol. 24, Berghahn Books, New York and Oxford.

APA

Lees-Maffei, G., & Fallan, K. (Eds.) (2016). Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization. (Making Sense of History; Vol. 24). New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books.

Vancouver

Lees-Maffei G, (ed.), Fallan K, (ed.). Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2016. 281 p. (Making Sense of History).

Author

Lees-Maffei, Grace (Editor) ; Fallan, Kjetil (Editor). / Designing Worlds : National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization. New York and Oxford : Berghahn Books, 2016. 281 p. (Making Sense of History).

Bibtex

@book{e65a02781d5a4e6e9d2ee074530c06f0,
title = "Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization",
abstract = "Contemporary design is simultaneously global, regional and national. ‘Italian’ cars, for example, may be designed by Britons and Brazilians and manufactured in Poland and Pakistan, on behalf of multi-national owners, for consumption in Switzerland and Swaziland. At the same time, international developments in higher education, the continuing influence of post-colonial theory, and the contemporary focus on sustainability, have led design historians to critique a bias towards Western industrialised nations based on a definition of design derived from its separation from industrial manufacture. Design historians are now looking further afield in writing Global Design History (to use the title of a 2011 anthology). National histories are criticised as unsuited to a new ‘global gaze’ in which contemporary society and historical narratives are to be freed from the geo-political straightjacket of nation states. Appadurai (1996) has even claimed that the nation state has become obsolete as a marker of identity construction. Is the nation simply imagined (Anderson, 1983), a modern myth, as Ernest Gellner (1983) claimed? Or can this admittedly complex construction still be a valuable framework for histories of design? The nation state is no longer the only socio-cultural or political-economic unit forming our identities and experiences, but national and regional histories of design have demonstrated cogent frameworks for the discussion of common socio-economic, cultural and identity issues. With contributions from all five continents, this book will provide a timely examination of the historiographic value of national frameworks and ask whether moves to discard them are premature.",
keywords = "DESIGN, Design History, Globalization, national identity",
editor = "Grace Lees-Maffei and Kjetil Fallan",
note = "Kjetil Fallan, Grace Lees-Maffei, Eds, ‘Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization’, (Oxford & New York: Berghahn Books, 2016), ISBN 1785331558. Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization edited by Kjetil Fallan and Grace Lees-Maffei is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "24",
language = "English",
isbn = "1785331558",
series = "Making Sense of History",
publisher = "Berghahn Books",

}

RIS

TY - BOOK

T1 - Designing Worlds

T2 - National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization

A2 - Lees-Maffei, Grace

A2 - Fallan, Kjetil

N1 - Kjetil Fallan, Grace Lees-Maffei, Eds, ‘Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization’, (Oxford & New York: Berghahn Books, 2016), ISBN 1785331558. Designing Worlds: National Design Histories in an Age of Globalization edited by Kjetil Fallan and Grace Lees-Maffei is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

PY - 2016/6/24

Y1 - 2016/6/24

N2 - Contemporary design is simultaneously global, regional and national. ‘Italian’ cars, for example, may be designed by Britons and Brazilians and manufactured in Poland and Pakistan, on behalf of multi-national owners, for consumption in Switzerland and Swaziland. At the same time, international developments in higher education, the continuing influence of post-colonial theory, and the contemporary focus on sustainability, have led design historians to critique a bias towards Western industrialised nations based on a definition of design derived from its separation from industrial manufacture. Design historians are now looking further afield in writing Global Design History (to use the title of a 2011 anthology). National histories are criticised as unsuited to a new ‘global gaze’ in which contemporary society and historical narratives are to be freed from the geo-political straightjacket of nation states. Appadurai (1996) has even claimed that the nation state has become obsolete as a marker of identity construction. Is the nation simply imagined (Anderson, 1983), a modern myth, as Ernest Gellner (1983) claimed? Or can this admittedly complex construction still be a valuable framework for histories of design? The nation state is no longer the only socio-cultural or political-economic unit forming our identities and experiences, but national and regional histories of design have demonstrated cogent frameworks for the discussion of common socio-economic, cultural and identity issues. With contributions from all five continents, this book will provide a timely examination of the historiographic value of national frameworks and ask whether moves to discard them are premature.

AB - Contemporary design is simultaneously global, regional and national. ‘Italian’ cars, for example, may be designed by Britons and Brazilians and manufactured in Poland and Pakistan, on behalf of multi-national owners, for consumption in Switzerland and Swaziland. At the same time, international developments in higher education, the continuing influence of post-colonial theory, and the contemporary focus on sustainability, have led design historians to critique a bias towards Western industrialised nations based on a definition of design derived from its separation from industrial manufacture. Design historians are now looking further afield in writing Global Design History (to use the title of a 2011 anthology). National histories are criticised as unsuited to a new ‘global gaze’ in which contemporary society and historical narratives are to be freed from the geo-political straightjacket of nation states. Appadurai (1996) has even claimed that the nation state has become obsolete as a marker of identity construction. Is the nation simply imagined (Anderson, 1983), a modern myth, as Ernest Gellner (1983) claimed? Or can this admittedly complex construction still be a valuable framework for histories of design? The nation state is no longer the only socio-cultural or political-economic unit forming our identities and experiences, but national and regional histories of design have demonstrated cogent frameworks for the discussion of common socio-economic, cultural and identity issues. With contributions from all five continents, this book will provide a timely examination of the historiographic value of national frameworks and ask whether moves to discard them are premature.

KW - DESIGN

KW - Design History

KW - Globalization

KW - national identity

UR - http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/FallanDesigning

M3 - Anthology

SN - 1785331558

T3 - Making Sense of History

BT - Designing Worlds

PB - Berghahn Books

CY - New York and Oxford

ER -