University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

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Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventBSPP Presidential Meeting 2014 - St Andrews, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Sep 20142 Sep 2014

Conference

ConferenceBSPP Presidential Meeting 2014
CountryUnited Kingdom
CitySt Andrews
Period1/09/142/09/14

Abstract

Light leaf spot, caused by the fungal pathogen Pyrenopeziza brassicae, is
currently the major disease problem in oilseed rape production in the
UK. Furthermore, P. brassicae can also be found on vegetable brassicas
such as cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. It is still unknown if
the same strains of the pathogen are able to infect both oilseed rape and
vegetable brassicas. Effective control of light leaf spot is difficult to
achieve. Chemical control of the disease is challenging as fungicides must
be applied when the pathogen grows symptomless in plant tissue
(Figueroa et al., 1994). Exploiting plant resistance against the pathogen
could help control the disease but current commercial cultivars show
poor light leaf spot resistance. The aim of the project is to identify the
pathogen population structure, to determine if the same strains are able
to infect oilseed rape and other brassicas, and to gain a better
understanding of the plant–pathogen interactions. Therefore, isolates of
P. brassicae are being collected from infected leaf (oilseed rape,
vegetables) and bud tissue (Brussels sprouts) from nine cultivars, which
have been drilled at four sites in England (Cambridgeshire,
Herefordshire, Lincolnshire, Yorkshire) and one site in Scotland
(Aberdeenshire). The isolates will be studied morphologically and
molecularly using neutral markers to determine differences between the
isolates. Certain isolates will be used for in planta screenings to
investigate differential interactions between isolates and potential host
cultivars

Notes

Poster abstract

ID: 9167443