University of Hertfordshire

Documents

  • K Charaabi
  • S Boukhris-Bouhachem
  • M Makni
  • B Fenton
  • Ian Denholm
View graph of relations
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)2313-2320
JournalPest Management Science
Journal publication date27 Oct 2016
Volume72
Issue12
Early online date16 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We used molecular assays to diagnose resistance to pyrethroids and pirimicarb in samples of Myzus persicae from field crops or an insect suction trap in Tunisia. Genotypes for resistance loci were related to ones for polymorphic microsatellite loci in order to investigate breeding systems and patterns of genetic diversity, and to inform resistance management tactics.
RESULTS

The kdr mutation L1014F conferring pyrethroid resistance was found in all samples. The M918T s-kdr mutation also occurred in most samples, but only in conjunction with kdr. We discovered a previously unreported genotype heterozygous for L1014F but homozygous for M918T. Samples with modified acetylcholinesterase (MACE) conferring resistance to pirimicarb were less common but widespread. 16% of samples contained both the kdr and MACE mutations. Many unique microsatellite genotypes were found, suggesting that M. persicae is holocyclic in Tunisia. There were no consistent associations between resistance and microsatellite markers.
CONCLUSION

This first study of insecticide resistance in M. persicae in North Africa showed genetic variation in insecticide resistance within microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGMs) and the same resistance mechanisms to be present in different MLGMs. This contrasts with variation in northern Europe where M. persicae is fully anholocyclic. Implications for selection and control strategies are discussed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry

Notes

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Charaabi, K., Boukhris-Bouhachem, S., Makni, M., Fenton, B. and Denholm, I. (2016), 'Genetic variation in target-site resistance to pyrethroids and pirimicarb in Tunisian populations of the peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae)', Pest. Manag. Sci., 72: 2313–2320, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ps.4276. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

ID: 10518268