University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

My familiar robot companion: Preferences and perceptions of CHARLY, a companion humanoid autonomous robot for living with you

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Autonomous Robotics
Subtitle of host publicationJoint Proceedings of the 13th Annual TAROS Conference and the 15th Annual FIRA RoboWorld Congress
PublisherSpringer
Pages300-312
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9783642325267
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event13th Annual TAROS Conference and the 15th Annual FIRA RoboWorld Congress - Bristol, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Aug 201223 Aug 2012

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
Volume7429

Conference

Conference13th Annual TAROS Conference and the 15th Annual FIRA RoboWorld Congress
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBristol
Period20/08/1223/08/12

Abstract

This paper presents findings from a survey conducted with visitors to the My Familiar Companion exhibit, part of the HUMAN+ Exhibition at the Science Gallery in Dublin. The exhibit consisted of a humanoid robot, CHARLY (Companion Humanoid Autonomous Robot for Living with You) with a head with a back projected morphing composite face derived from nearby people. Visitors answered a computer-based questionnaire to gain their perceptions and opinions of the exhibit, and also their preferences for a robot that they would like to have in their own home. The main findings indicated that most respondents would not want a very human-like robot, but most would prefer to own a robot with some human-like attributes and capabilities. A principle component analyses indicated that people perceive two main factors when rating their preferences for their preferred robots, Physical Similarity and Expressive Similarity. Both these derived factors correlate strongly to their ratings for Human-likeness versus Machine-likeness. It was found that slightly more male than female respondents were more likely to relate to their own robot as a colleague, though overall, most respondents would relate to their own robot as a servant or tool.

ID: 2093597