University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Neon Noir: An album of songs and music videos

Research output: Non-textual formComposition

  • Timothy Blinko (Composer)
  • Dan Halford (Other)
  • Freddie Gerrard-Abbott (Photographer)
  • Nick Blinko (Artist)
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Original languageEnglish
PublisherApple Music
Media of outputOnline
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2017

Abstract

Neon Noir is an audio-visual work comprising nine songs, one instrumental piece and eight videos, released as a complete album in December 2017. It was published by Apple Music (8th December 2017) https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/neon-noir/1315998115 and is also available to stream on Spotify and Deezer, and for digital download on Google Play and Amazon Music. To date there have been 2,603 viewings by people who have found their way to the videos. Promotion to specialist blogs, festivals/award organisations and radio commences in late March 2018. The videos are recommended as the best way to experience Neon Noir and can be viewed at:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjxH3UW9M3DtqP9CmNc5Exu9lPbtbfUq-

The album artwork for Neon Noir was created by artist Nick Blinko https://inews.co.uk/culture/arts/outsider-artist-nick-blinko-compromises-sanity-create through a collaborative process. Other collaborators include Dan Halford (Southampton University) – audio engineering and mastering, and Freddie Gerrard-Abbott – camera and post-production.

Notes

Drawing from the synaesthetic and multisensory nature of the work, place and colour are highly significant research imperatives in all the videos to both locate and provoke. For example Gothic Night showcases the grade 1 listed medieval murals at Piccotts End: ‘We’ll never know who painted these beautiful things… these glorious images.’ (Prof. Simon Schama: 2015). The images are a freak survivor having been covered under multiple layers of linen and wallpaper for nearly 500 years. Their complexity and design is combined with the use of hyper-real colour, monocolour and monochrome in the cinematography to reflect the full sensorial and conscious world, and the compromised consciousness of amnesia. Reception: British pianist Ian Jones (Professor, Royal College of Music) has described A New Day as: 'So beautiful and touching, and clever, and perfect. You've achieved the holy grail of hidden, careful craftsmanship resulting in that elusive sense of simplicity.’ [I. Jones 2017]

ID: 688846