University of Hertfordshire

Patch dynamics for studies on nematode pathogenicity and reproductive rates using UAVs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  • Christer Magnusson
  • Ricardo Holgado
  • Keith Davies
  • Deliang Peng
  • Marte Tangvik
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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAspects of Applied Biology
Subtitle of host publicationPrecision systems in agricultural and horticultural production
Place of PublicationWarwick, UK
PublisherAssociation of Applied Biologists
Pages65-72
Volume135
ISBN (Print)0265-1491
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2017
EventPrecision systems in agricultural and horticultural production - Pershore College, Worcester, United Kingdom
Duration: 26 Oct 201727 Oct 2017
https://horticulture.ahdb.org.uk/event/precision-systems-agricultural-and-horticultural-production

Conference

ConferencePrecision systems in agricultural and horticultural production
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityWorcester
Period26/10/1727/10/17
Internet address

Abstract

Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic roundworms that feed on plant roots causing disruption to the uptake of water and nutrients resulting in reductions of plant growth and yield. Due to current prohibitions in the use of synthetic nematicides future control strategies for nematodes management need to rely on alternative strategies the rely on biological information.
Free-living plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN) are potentially an increasing problem in Norwegian agriculture. Methods of efficient nematode management have been sought for by agricultural advisors and farmers. Successful management of PPN needs to rely on robust information on nematode damage thresholds on crops including their reproductive rates. Information on these parameters often relate to studies conducted in the laboratory and results from such experiments may be imprecise and have little applicability to field conditions due to the difficulties of maintaining and manipulating nematodes successfully in pots.
Previous studies have shown that transects through nematode patches to be useful in understanding damaging thresholds in the field while also being able to monitor the populations of microbes that are associated with nematode suppression. We intend to use patches in fields caused by nematode damage as naturally occurring experiments. By recording nematode densities along transects through such patches, and correlating this with plant growth parameters, we will estimate the damaging thresholds and reproductive rates of selected free-living PPN for each crop under realistic conditions. In this project we will take advantage of new developments in unmanned aerial vehicle (drone) for aerial photography and subsequent image analysis. By recording nematode densities along transects through such patches, and correlating this with plant growth parameters, we will estimate the damaging thresholds and reproductive rates of selected free-living plant parasitic nematodes for each crop under realistic conditions.

Notes

© 2017 The Association of Applied Biologists

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