University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Planning for Success in Introducing and Embedding Technology to Enhance Learning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Documents

  • 907064

    Accepted author manuscript, 129 KB, PDF document

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings for the 12th European Conference on E-Learning
Subtitle of host publicationECEL 2013
EditorsMelanie Ciussi, Marc Augier
Place of PublicationReading, UK
PublisherACPI (Academic Conference Publishing International)
Pages156-163
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)978-1909507-84-5
ISBN (Print)978-1-909507-82-1
Publication statusPublished - 29 Oct 2013
Event12th European Conference on E-Learning - SKEMA Business School, Sophia Antipolis,Nice, France
Duration: 30 Oct 20131 Nov 2013

Conference

Conference12th European Conference on E-Learning
CountryFrance
CitySophia Antipolis,Nice
Period30/10/131/11/13

Abstract

The authors reflect on the outcomes of recent change management projects for introducing technology into Higher Education in the UK and discuss key aspects which have led to success in the increasing use and subsequent embedding of learning technologies in the classroom. They focus on three areas where it is suggested that institutions need to ‘get it right’ in terms of justifying the expensive introduction of technology into the learning environment: the building and maintaining of the technical infrastructure; the provision of appropriate initial and continuing user support, which includes relating the use of technology to pedagogy; and the management of the impact of change on those who are faced with adapting to different ways of learning and teaching. These are mapped to a set of critical success factors by the authors.

The paper investigate these firstly, via a case-study within a technology-focussed university, where its commitment to the enhancement of the student experience through using technology to support assessment and feedback mechanisms has increased. The authors explore how academics were encouraged to become further engaged within the process. Consequently, the use of technology in the classroom was no longer seen as being the preserve of a group of ‘enthusiasts’ or ‘early adopters’ but was perceived to be relevant to a wider user group. A further case-study shows how the critical success factors were applied to develop a flexible learning module within a more traditional teaching environment.

This paper explores the importance of balancing underlying pedagogical approaches to the introduction of new technologies. It is proposed that while technology can be an excellent tool it should not drive the pedagogy. The aim finally is to ensure that throughout and following a period of change both academics and students can benefit from the appropriate use of technology to enhance learning

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