University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Progressive damage in woven CFRPP in presence of shock waves

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationECCM 2012 - Composites at Venice, Proceedings of the 15th European Conference on Composite Materials
PublisherEuropean Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM
ISBN (Print)9788888785332
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
Event15th European Conference on Composite Materials: Composites at Venice, ECCM 2012 - Venice, Italy
Duration: 24 Jun 201228 Jun 2012

Publication series

NameECCM 2012 - Composites at Venice, Proceedings of the 15th European Conference on Composite Materials

Conference

Conference15th European Conference on Composite Materials: Composites at Venice, ECCM 2012
CountryItaly
CityVenice
Period24/06/1228/06/12

Abstract

The primary objective of the work presented in this paper was to develop a continuum thermoelastic-damage model for carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials, capable of modelling high rate deformation typical for ballistic impact loading. The constitutive model is capable of predicting formation and propagation of the shock waves in orthotropic materials and in addition can simulate damage initiation, evolution and failure. A key feature of the constitutive model is the decomposition of material volumetric and shear response. Material response under compression in this model is defined in terms of Mie Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) and the decomposition of stress tensor proposed in [1]. In order to take into account the orthotropy of the CFRP materials of interest, damage in this constitutive model is represented by a second order damage tensor ω, which is incorporated in the stiffness tensor by using energy equivalence principle, see for instance [2]. Validation of the numerical model, implemented in LLNL DYNA3D [3] was done by the comparison of the numerical results to the experimental data obtained in the high velocity sphere impact tests published in [4]. The numerical results for the extent of damage were within 8% with the corresponding experimental data.

ID: 17390877