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Sense and Simplicity: Wittgenstein's Argument for Simple Objects

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Sense and Simplicity : Wittgenstein's Argument for Simple Objects. / Tejedor, Chon.

In: Ratio, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.09.2003, p. 272-289.

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Tejedor, Chon. / Sense and Simplicity : Wittgenstein's Argument for Simple Objects. In: Ratio. 2003 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 272-289.

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@article{43309f33d09b49268f8c3fb8594e66cd,
title = "Sense and Simplicity: Wittgenstein's Argument for Simple Objects",
abstract = "This paper puts forward an alternative interpretation of the argument for simple objects advanced in the 2.0s of the Tractatus. In my view, Wittgenstein derives the simplicity of objects directly from his account of possible states, complex objects and senseful propositions. The key to Wittgenstein's argument is the idea that, if there were no simple objects, possible states would not be necessarily possible. If this were the case, however, there would be no senseful language, in Wittgenstein's view. One of the subsidiary aims of this paper is to question the idea that Wittgenstein posits simples because, without them, language would be infinitely analysable.",
author = "Chon Tejedor",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/1467-9329.00222",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "272--289",
journal = "Ratio",
issn = "0034-0006",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sense and Simplicity

T2 - Wittgenstein's Argument for Simple Objects

AU - Tejedor, Chon

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - This paper puts forward an alternative interpretation of the argument for simple objects advanced in the 2.0s of the Tractatus. In my view, Wittgenstein derives the simplicity of objects directly from his account of possible states, complex objects and senseful propositions. The key to Wittgenstein's argument is the idea that, if there were no simple objects, possible states would not be necessarily possible. If this were the case, however, there would be no senseful language, in Wittgenstein's view. One of the subsidiary aims of this paper is to question the idea that Wittgenstein posits simples because, without them, language would be infinitely analysable.

AB - This paper puts forward an alternative interpretation of the argument for simple objects advanced in the 2.0s of the Tractatus. In my view, Wittgenstein derives the simplicity of objects directly from his account of possible states, complex objects and senseful propositions. The key to Wittgenstein's argument is the idea that, if there were no simple objects, possible states would not be necessarily possible. If this were the case, however, there would be no senseful language, in Wittgenstein's view. One of the subsidiary aims of this paper is to question the idea that Wittgenstein posits simples because, without them, language would be infinitely analysable.

U2 - 10.1111/1467-9329.00222

DO - 10.1111/1467-9329.00222

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 272

EP - 289

JO - Ratio

JF - Ratio

SN - 0034-0006

IS - 3

ER -