University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

By the same authors

  • Elena Nikiphorou
  • Sam Norton
  • Keith Young
  • Josh Dixey
  • David Walsh
  • Henrietta Helliwell
  • Patrick Kiely
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Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)1194-1202
JournalRheumatology
Journal publication date1 Jul 2018
Volume57
Issue7
Early online date26 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To examine associations between BMI and disease activity, functional ability and quality of life in RA.

METHODS:
Data from two consecutive, similarly designed UK multicentre RA inception cohorts were used: the Early RA Study (ERAS) and the Early RA Network (ERAN). Recruitment figures/median follow-up for the ERAS and ERAN were 1465/10 years (maximum 25 years), and 1236/6 years (maximum 10 years), respectively. Standard demographic and clinical variables were recorded at baseline and annually. Multilevel piecewise longitudinal models with a change point at 2 years were used with the 28-joint DAS (DAS28), ESR, HAQ and 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) components as dependent variables. BMI was examined in separate models as both continuous and categorical variables (based on World Health Organization definitions) and up to 5 years from disease onset.

RESULTS:
BMI data from 2386 newly diagnosed RA patients (11 348 measures) showed an increase in BMI of 0.27 U annually (95% CI 0.21, 0.33). Baseline obesity was associated with a significant reduction in the odds of achieving a low year 2 DAS28 [OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.41, 0.650)]. At year 2, HAQ and SF-36 PCS scores were significantly worse but not at year 5 in patients obese at baseline. Obesity at year 2 was associated with higher DAS28 scores at year 2, but not at year 5, and also associated with significantly higher HAQ and SF-36 PCS scores at years 2 and 5.

CONCLUSION:
Obesity prevalence is rising in early RA and associates with worse disease activity, function and health-related quality of life, with a significant negative impact on achieving a low DAS28. The data argue strongly for obesity management to become central to treatment strategies in RA.

Notes

© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved.

ID: 16569884