Are bullies more productive? Empirical study of affectiveness vs. issue fixing time

Marco Ortu, Bram Adams, Giuseppe Destefanis, Parastou Tourani, Michele Marchesi, Roberto Tonelli

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    96 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Human Affectiveness, i.e., The emotional state of a person, plays a crucial role in many domains where it can make or break a team's ability to produce successful products. Software development is a collaborative activity as well, yet there is little information on how affectiveness impacts software productivity. As a first measure of this impact, this paper analyzes the relation between sentiment, emotions and politeness of developers in more than 560K Jira comments with the time to fix a Jira issue. We found that the happier developers are (expressing emotions such as JOY and LOVE in their comments), the shorter the issue fixing time is likely to be. In contrast, negative emotions such as SADNESS, are linked with longer issue fixing time. Politeness plays a more complex role and we empirically analyze its impact on developers' productivity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - 12th Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories, MSR 2015
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    Pages303-313
    Number of pages11
    Volume2015-August
    ISBN (Electronic)9780769555942
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Aug 2015
    Event12th Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories, MSR 2015 - Florence, Italy
    Duration: 16 May 201517 May 2015

    Conference

    Conference12th Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories, MSR 2015
    Country/TerritoryItaly
    CityFlorence
    Period16/05/1517/05/15

    Keywords

    • Electronic publishing
    • Information services
    • Logistics
    • Measurement
    • Software
    • Software engineering
    • Training

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