Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients

Nazish Khan, Mamas A. Mamas, Alexandra Moss, Diana A. Gorog, Peter Nightingale, Angel Armesilla, Andrew Smallwood, Shahzad Munir, Saib Khogali, Ben Wrigley, James M. Cotton

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Abstract

Aspirin, the most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agent in clinical practice, forms a cornerstone of management in patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD). The clinical efficacy and safety of aspirin when prescribed for secondary prevention is supported by a robust evidence base demonstrating a 24% reduction in mortality and a 25% reduction in serious adverse events without any increase in bleeding complications in the context of an acute myocardial infarction [ 1 ]. Nevertheless, numerous studies have shown that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin is not uniform and is often sub-optimal in a sizable proportion of patients [ 2 , 3 ]. Inadequate platelet inhibition following the administration of aspirin is associated with recurrent cardiovascular events and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease [ 2 ].
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-525
Number of pages3
JournalThrombosis Research: Vascular Obstruction, Hemorrhage and Hemostasis
Volume196
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sept 2020

Keywords

  • Aspirin resistance
  • Mortality
  • NSTEMI

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