Bullying victimization: time trends and the overlap between traditional and cyberbullying across countries in Europe and North America

Alina Cosma, Sophie Walsh, Kayleigh Chester, Mary Callaghan, Michal Molcho, Wendy Craig, William Pickett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)
90 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives
This study explores recent cross-national trends over time (2002–2014) in the occurrence of victimization by bullying; then it documents the overlap between cybervictimization and traditional bullying in 2014 among adolescents in 37 countries.
Methods
Data from four cycles (2002, 2006, 2010, and 2014) of the cross-national Health Behavior in School-Aged Children study were included (N = 764,518). Trends in traditional victimization were evaluated using logistic regression models in 37 countries. Prevalence of cybervictimization and the overlap between cybervictimization and traditional victimization were estimated.
Results
Linear decreases in bullying victimization were observed in 21 countries among boys, and in 12 countries among girls. The prevalence of cybervictimization was systematically lower than traditional victimization. Overall across all countries, 45.8% of those who reported cybervictimization also reported traditional victimization (46.5% for boys and 45.3% for girls), but wide country variations were observed.
Conclusions
These indicate the need for a more holistic perspective to intervention and prevention that considers all expressions of bullying, traditional or online. Public health programs and policies could focus on addressing bullying more broadly, rather than focusing on behaviors that happen in a particular context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-85
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume65
Issue number1
Early online date16 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Bullying
  • Cybervictimization
  • HBSC
  • Victimization

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