Expression and clinical significance of concomitant FAK/SRC and p-Paxillin in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

Stamatios Theocharis, Ioly Kotta-Loizou, Constantinos Giaginis, Paraskevi Alexandrou, Eugene Danas, Gerasimos Tsourouflis, Nikolaos Tsoukalas, Robert Coutts, Jason Tasoulas, Jeremy Klijanienko

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
63 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM:
The focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/SRC phosphorylation cascade and its downstream target paxillin have been implicated in malignant transformation, tumor growth and progression, together with metastasis. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of concomitant FAK/SRC and p-paxillin expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
FAK, SRC and phospho-paxillin expression in 48 mobile tongue SCC tissue samples was assessed immunohistochemically and analyzed with respect to clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival.
RESULTS:
Concomitant high FAK/SRC expression was significantly associated with high grade of tumor differentiation (p=0.048) and longer disease-free patient survival (log-rank test, p=0.019). High p-paxillin expression was significantly associated with greater depth of invasion (p=0.002), lymph node metastasis (p=0.048) and poorer disease-free patient survival (log-rank test, p=0.021; Cox-regression analysis, p=0.031).
CONCLUSION:
The present study provides evidence that FAK/SRC and paxillin play a role in the pathophysiological aspects of mobile tongue SCC and could constitute therapeutic targets.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1313-1319
Number of pages7
Volume37
No.3
Specialist publicationAnticancer Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma
  • FAK
  • SRC
  • paxillin
  • chinicopathological parameters
  • prognosis
  • Immunohistochemistry

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