Production benefits recall of novel words with frequent, but not infrequent sound patterns

Belen Lopez Assef, Stephanie Strahm, Keara Boyce, Michael Page, Tania S. Zamuner

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Abstract

The production effect is influenced by various factors, including cognitive and linguistic related variables. Previous studies found that the production effect varies when stimuli have native versus non-native speech sounds, but to date, no studies have investigated whether the effect is also modulated by the frequency of sound patterns within a language. Adults were taught novel words in two training conditions: Produced or Heard. These items were comprised of English sound patterns that varied in frequency. Participants trained on frequent English patterns recalled more Produced than Heard items. In contrast, participants trained on infrequent English patterns showed no difference in recall rates between conditions. The strength and direction of the production effect is modulated not only by native versus non-native speech sounds, but can also vary depending on the frequency of the sound patterns within a speaker’s native language. Thus, the production effect is linked to previously established, long-term phonological knowledge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalGlossa
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jan 2023

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