Resilience and survival: black teenage mothers 'looked after' by the State tell their stories about their experience of care

Nadia Mantovani, Hilary Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
176 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

‘Looked after’ young people are among the most disadvantaged members of our society. While their disadvantaged status should not be ignored, poor outcomes are often emphasised at the expense of good ones. This paper reports a study that adopts the concept of resilience to understand the narratives of the participants’ experience of care and foster care. A total of 15 young mothers, aged 16-19 and mainly from black African backgrounds, were interviewed. Despite lacking a ‘secure base’, informants invested in a sense of moral identity and a source of self-directedness, which enabled them to move from victim of circumstances to individuals who overcome their circumstances.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-309
Number of pages11
JournalChildren and Society
Volume29
Issue number4
Early online date31 May 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • asylum seeking
  • black teenage mothers
  • 'looked after'
  • resilience
  • unaccompanied minors

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