Setting Conditions for Productive Debriefing

Guillaume Der Sahakian, Guillaume Alinier, Georges Savoldelli, Denis Oriot, Morgan Jaffrelot, François Lecomte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)
61 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background. Debriefing is a fundamental step in simulation, particularly in the medical field. Simulation sometimes even serves as a pretext for debriefing. Most often, debriefing takes place easily, producing a qualitative feedback and an optimal learning transfer. But sometimes, the facilitator faces difficulties. An unproductive debriefing can be described as follows: the debriefing of a clinical simulation session is unproductive when facilitators or learners perceive the occurrence of an obstacle that has hindered the learning process. Objectives & method. Considering the difficulties encountered in this type of debriefing, we believe it is necessary to investigate the topic in depth in order to bring out some theoretical principles. Based on a Nominal Group Technique involving the authors of this article, this project aimed at drawing up and proposing informed recommendations for ensuring productive debriefing in simulation-based education in healthcare. Results. The authors make the following recommendations: Reflect on your own performances as an instructor (asking for feedback from the learners and peers, and being appropriately trained as an instructor who can facilitate learning) Establish simulation ground rules (preparing and briefing the learners before the simulation experience, controlling the timing of the simulation session and the quality of the scenarios) Manage unexpected events and intended learning objectives by using a confederate during scenarios. Respect the steps of the debriefing process and good practice recommendations regarding learning psychology. Maintain the balance between emotion and teaching by decontextualizing the experience from the participants during the debriefing. Manage the input from the peers during the debriefing so they do not antagonise the learning process. Reflect on your own performances as an instructor (asking for feedback from the learners and peers, and being appropriately trained as an instructor who can facilitate learning) Establish simulation ground rules (preparing and briefing the learners before the simulation experience, controlling the timing of the simulation session and the quality of the scenarios) Manage unexpected events and intended learning objectives by using a confederate during scenarios. Respect the steps of the debriefing process and good practice recommendations regarding learning psychology. Maintain the balance between emotion and teaching by decontextualizing the experience from the participants during the debriefing. Manage the input from the peers during the debriefing so they do not antagonise the learning process. Conclusion. Six key recommendations are proposed. They have been deemed as core skills required of every simulation facilitator to prepare for productive debriefing and so the set learning objectives of a simulation session can be achieved successfully.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-208
Number of pages12
JournalSimulation and Gaming
Volume46
Issue number2
Early online date23 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Apr 2015

Keywords

  • confederate
  • decontextualizing
  • education
  • feedback
  • healthcare
  • instructor
  • learning process
  • preventing
  • productive debriefing
  • recommendations
  • scenarios
  • simulation

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