Shared decision-making for psychiatric medication: A mixed-methods evaluation of a UK training programme for service users and clinicians

Shulamit Ramon, Nicola Morant, Ute Stead, Ben Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
48 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Shared decision making (SDM) is recognised as a promising strategy to enhance good collaboration between clinicians and service users, yet it is not practised regularly in mental health. Aims: Develop and evaluate a novel training programme to enhance SDM in psychiatric medication management for service users, psychiatrists and care co-ordinators. Methods: The training programme design was informed by existing literature and local stakeholders consultations. Parallel group-based training programmes on SDM process were delivered to community mental health service users and providers. Evaluation consisted of quantitative measures at baseline and 12-month follow-up, post-programme participant feedback and qualitative interviews. Results: Training was provided to 47 service users, 35 care-coordinators and 12 psychiatrists. Participant feedback was generally positive. Statistically significant changes in service users’ decisional conflict and perceptions of practitioners’ interactional style in promoting SDM occurred at the follow-up. Qualitative data suggested positive impacts on service users’ and care co-ordinators confidence to explore medication experience, and group-based training was valued. Conclusions: The programme was generally acceptable to service users and practitioners. This indicates the value of conducting a larger study and exploring application for non-medical decisions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-772
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
Volume63
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • evaluated training programme
  • professionals
  • psychiatric medication
  • service users
  • Shared decision making

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