Social Support in Sport Injury and Rehabilitation: Social Support in Sport Injury and Rehabilitation

Stephen Pack, Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Travis Scheadler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Social support has been one of the most rigorously and frequently researched psychosocial resources (Thoits, 1995). The notion that people feel the need to be associated with others who provide love, warmth, social ties, and a sense of belonging has long been considered as an emotionally satisfying aspect of life. Many philosophers have discussed the social needs of people, and psychologists have postulated needs for social caring and nurture (Fromm, 1955; Litwak & Szelenyi, 1969; Maslow, 1954, 1968). Social support has also been found to mediate the stress-health link, enabling individuals to better cope with stressful events, thereby reducing the likelihood stress will lead to poor health outcomes (Sarason et al., 1997). A great deal of evidence exists regarding the availability of social support and the reduced risks of mental and physical health problems (e.g., Berkman, 1984; Cohen & Wills, 1985; Thoits, 1995).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Psychology of Sport Injury and Rehabilitation 2nd edition
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter18
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 18 Apr 2023

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