Spoken word recognition of novel words, either produced or only heard during learning

Tania S. Zamuner, Elizabeth Morin-Lessard, Stephanie Strahm, Michael P A Page

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)
38 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Psycholinguistic models of spoken word production differ in how they conceptualize the relationship between lexical, phonological and output representations, making different predictions for the role of production in language acquisition and language processing. This work examines the impact of production on spoken word recognition of newly learned non-words. In Experiment 1, adults were trained on non-words with visual referents; during training, they produced half of the non-words, with the other half being heard-only. Using a visual world paradigm at test, eye tracking results indicated faster recognition of non-words that were produced compared with heard-only during training. In Experiment 2, non-words were correctly pronounced or mispronounced at test. Participants showed a different pattern of recognition for mispronunciation on non-words that were produced compared with heard-only during training. Together these results indicate that production affects the representations of newly learned words.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-67
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume89
Early online date1 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Eyetracking
  • Production
  • Spoken word recognition
  • Word learning

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