The British Ju-jitsu Society and the influence of Kodokan Judo on early jujutsu in the U.K.

David Brough, Slaviša Bradić, Mike Callan, Lance Gatling, Llyr Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the United Kingdom (U.K.) in the late Victorian and early
Edwardian eras there was an explosion in the popularity of the
Japanese martial art jujutsu, with seemingly invincible Japanese
exponents touring and taking on all comers in the music halls.
As this early wave of popularity subsided a number of organisations
were established to continue the practice of jujutsu, and
other Japanese martial arts. Most notable of these was The Budokwai
in London, established in 1918 by Gunji Koizumi, which
from 1920 would become one of the foremost judo clubs in the
West. Recent discoveries shed light on another organisation
from this era called the British Ju-jitsu Society (BJS). Established
in 1926, the BJS co-existed with The Budokwai and had member
clubs throughout the U.K. Here, we provide an overview of the
BJS, its activity, and insights into its operation and legacy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-60
Number of pages19
JournalMartial Arts Studies
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Jujutsu, Judo, BJS, Budokwai, Kata, Kodokan

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