The interaction effect of gender and residential environment, individual resources, and needs satisfaction on quality of life among older adults in the UK

Chi Pun Liu, Dion Sik-yee Leung, Julia Warrener

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine the difference in gender and its impact on selected quality of life (QoL) domains of Social Production Function Theory among older adults in England. Methods: Based on an annual national adult social care service user survey conducted in the UK in 2016. QoL was assessed by a single-item construct and independent variables were home design, access to information and local area, self-rated health, perceived pain/discomfort, perceived anxiety/depression, activities of daily living, use and satisfaction of formal and informal care, and demographic variables. Results: 28,955 respondents aged 65+ were interviewed. Multinomial logistic regression analysis found four interaction effects for predicting a very good/good QoL: (1) Female receiving non-co-residing informal care (OR=1.501, p<.01), (2) Female feeling safe (OR=1.499, p<.01), (3) Female feeling satisfied with social contact with people (OR=1.465, p<.05), and (4) Female being helped in the use of time (OR=1.370, p<.05). Conclusion: Findings suggest gender differences in QoL as men and women are heterogenous with different health and disease patterns, health-/help-seeking behaviours, roles and responsibilities, and levels of resilience, needs, risks, and access and control resources. Practitioners should adopt a gender-specific assessment and personalised interventions to promote gender equality, empowerment, and long-term sustainable development for an ageing society.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2333721419878579
Journal Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine (GGM)
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Sept 2019

Keywords

  • Gender differences, Formal and informal care, Safety and security, Social contact, Use of time

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