The role of acculturation in the relationship between self-stigma and psychological distress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors

Krystal Warmoth, Celia C Y Wong, Lingjun Chen, Shelby Ivy, Qian Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Attitudes about breast cancer have improved in the USA, yet stigma is still present in some ethnic and immigrant populations and affecting survivors' experiences. Chinese American breast cancer survivors report negative beliefs and stigma to be a major stressor; this could result in mental health consequences. We hypothesized that greater self-stigma will be related to greater psychological distress (namely, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress). Furthermore, we expected that the association between self-stigma and psychological distress will be stronger among Chinese American breast cancer survivors who are less acculturated to the USA than those who are highly acculturated. One hundred and thirty-six Chinese American breast cancer survivors completed questionnaires that measured self-stigma, acculturation, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and demographic information. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to examine the main effect of stigma on depressive symptoms and perceived stress, and the moderating effect of acculturation. As predicted, self-stigma was associated with greater depressive symptoms and perceived stress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially those who are less acculturated. Self-stigma may play a part in psychological adjustment among Chinese American breast cancer survivors. Interventions that incorporate techniques to reduce self-stigma could be beneficial for Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially for those who are less acculturated to American society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1278-1292
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume25
Issue number10
Early online date16 Mar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • adjustment
  • breast cancer
  • culture
  • depression
  • perceived stress

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