What value do consumers really expect from Product Service Systems? Reflections on how a different conception of value could facilitate the implementation of PSS in consumer markets

Maurizio Catulli, Matthew Cook, Stephen Potter

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

Purpose – This paper explores how PSS may create value in consumer markets in urban environment and how consumers value PSS beyond a narrow focus on functionality.
Design/ methodology/approach – Within a case study of a use orientated PSS based on baby products, we conducted ten ethnographic interviews of current users of the scheme.
Findings – Our data gives evidence that some of these products are important possessions for consumers’ identity construction. In contrast with highly visible products such as push-chairs, however, baby cots and car seats are seen by consumers from a more utilitarian perspective.
Practical implications – The design of a PSS provision around products which are highly symbolic is problematic because of a need to fully understand the complex symbolism and hedonic value consumers attribute to these products.
Originality /value – We fill a gap in PSS research by adopting a constructivist perspective to explore the multidimensional value consumers co-create around a baby products PSS.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 4 Nov 2014
EventSustainable Innovation 2014 - 19th Int Conf - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 3 Nov 20144 Nov 2014

Conference

ConferenceSustainable Innovation 2014 - 19th Int Conf
Country/TerritoryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period3/11/144/11/14

Keywords

  • Case Study
  • Ethnography
  • Hedonic Value
  • Integration
  • PSS
  • Symbolic Value
  • Value

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