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A Motivational Peer Support Program for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Delivered by People With Type 2 Diabetes: The UEA-IFG Feasibility Study. / Murray, N.J.; Gasper, A.V.; Irvine, Lisa; Scarpello, Tracey; Sampson, M.J.

In: The Diabetes Educator, Vol. 38, No. 3, 01.05.2012, p. 366-376.

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@article{c254acbf7d404416b63e606194f6f597,
title = "A Motivational Peer Support Program for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Delivered by People With Type 2 Diabetes: The UEA-IFG Feasibility Study",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a peer support program for individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes as part of a novel Diabetes Prevention Programme (The UEA-IFG Study). Lay members of the public with existing type 2 diabetes volunteered as peer supporters (termed type 2 trainers) for participants at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The feasibility of type 2 trainer recruitment, training, and retention was tested. Methods: Between January and September 2009, 1500 potential type 2 trainers with existing type 2 diabetes were contacted and 168 (11%) expressed an interest. From this group, 26 type 2 trainers were appointed to begin training. All completed 7 training seminars, covering diabetes prevention, nutrition, physical activity, listening skills, motivation, and goal planning. Motivational calls were made every 12 weeks to each study participant by each type 2 trainer in addition to health care professional-delivered education sessions. Results: Twenty-six type 2 trainers were recruited to enter the program. One type 2 trainer withdrew before beginning their role. The retention rate was high, with 22 (89%) of the type 2 trainers continuing until study end (July 2010; 20 months), with a total of 240 phone calls made. Conclusion: The recruiting and training of lay volunteers with existing type 2 diabetes as type 2 trainers to support study participants at risk of developing the same condition was a cost-effective strategy in comparison to employing salaried health care professionals and warrants further investigation on health outcomes.",
keywords = "Young Adult, Motivation, Health Educators, Humans, Prediabetic State, Aged, Counseling, Patient Education as Top, Feasibility Studies, Risk Reduction Behavior, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Adult, Interviews as Topic, Middle Aged, Female, Male",
author = "N.J. Murray and A.V. Gasper and Lisa Irvine and Tracey Scarpello and M.J. Sampson",
year = "2012",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0145721712440332",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "366--376",
journal = "The Diabetes Educator",
issn = "0145-7217",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Motivational Peer Support Program for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Delivered by People With Type 2 Diabetes: The UEA-IFG Feasibility Study

AU - Murray, N.J.

AU - Gasper, A.V.

AU - Irvine, Lisa

AU - Scarpello, Tracey

AU - Sampson, M.J.

PY - 2012/5/1

Y1 - 2012/5/1

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a peer support program for individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes as part of a novel Diabetes Prevention Programme (The UEA-IFG Study). Lay members of the public with existing type 2 diabetes volunteered as peer supporters (termed type 2 trainers) for participants at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The feasibility of type 2 trainer recruitment, training, and retention was tested. Methods: Between January and September 2009, 1500 potential type 2 trainers with existing type 2 diabetes were contacted and 168 (11%) expressed an interest. From this group, 26 type 2 trainers were appointed to begin training. All completed 7 training seminars, covering diabetes prevention, nutrition, physical activity, listening skills, motivation, and goal planning. Motivational calls were made every 12 weeks to each study participant by each type 2 trainer in addition to health care professional-delivered education sessions. Results: Twenty-six type 2 trainers were recruited to enter the program. One type 2 trainer withdrew before beginning their role. The retention rate was high, with 22 (89%) of the type 2 trainers continuing until study end (July 2010; 20 months), with a total of 240 phone calls made. Conclusion: The recruiting and training of lay volunteers with existing type 2 diabetes as type 2 trainers to support study participants at risk of developing the same condition was a cost-effective strategy in comparison to employing salaried health care professionals and warrants further investigation on health outcomes.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a peer support program for individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes as part of a novel Diabetes Prevention Programme (The UEA-IFG Study). Lay members of the public with existing type 2 diabetes volunteered as peer supporters (termed type 2 trainers) for participants at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The feasibility of type 2 trainer recruitment, training, and retention was tested. Methods: Between January and September 2009, 1500 potential type 2 trainers with existing type 2 diabetes were contacted and 168 (11%) expressed an interest. From this group, 26 type 2 trainers were appointed to begin training. All completed 7 training seminars, covering diabetes prevention, nutrition, physical activity, listening skills, motivation, and goal planning. Motivational calls were made every 12 weeks to each study participant by each type 2 trainer in addition to health care professional-delivered education sessions. Results: Twenty-six type 2 trainers were recruited to enter the program. One type 2 trainer withdrew before beginning their role. The retention rate was high, with 22 (89%) of the type 2 trainers continuing until study end (July 2010; 20 months), with a total of 240 phone calls made. Conclusion: The recruiting and training of lay volunteers with existing type 2 diabetes as type 2 trainers to support study participants at risk of developing the same condition was a cost-effective strategy in comparison to employing salaried health care professionals and warrants further investigation on health outcomes.

KW - Young Adult

KW - Motivation

KW - Health Educators

KW - Humans

KW - Prediabetic State

KW - Aged

KW - Counseling

KW - Patient Education as Top

KW - Feasibility Studies

KW - Risk Reduction Behavior

KW - Cost-Benefit Analysis

KW - Adult

KW - Interviews as Topic

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Female

KW - Male

U2 - 10.1177/0145721712440332

DO - 10.1177/0145721712440332

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 366

EP - 376

JO - The Diabetes Educator

JF - The Diabetes Educator

SN - 0145-7217

IS - 3

ER -