University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

By the same authors

  • Martin Kanovsky
  • Julia Halamova
  • David Zuroff
  • Nicholas Troop
  • Paul Gilbert
  • Ben Shahar
  • Nicola Petrocchi
  • Nicola Hermanto
  • Tobias Krieger
  • James Kirby
  • Kenichi Asano
  • Marcela Matos
  • Fuya Yu
  • Jaskaran Basran
  • Nuriye Kupeli
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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychological Assessment
Early online date30 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Dec 2020

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test the multilevel multidimensional finite mixture item response model of the Forms of Self-Criticising/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS) to cluster respondents and countries from 13 samples (N = 7,714) and from 12 countries. The practical goal was to learn how many discrete classes there are on the level of individuals (i.e., how many cut-offs are to be used) and countries (i.e., the magnitude of similarities and dissimilarities among them). We employed the multilevel multidimensional finite mixture approach which is based on an extended class of multidimensional latent class Item Response Theory (IRT) models. Individuals and countries are partitioned into discrete latent classes with different levels of self-criticism and self-reassurance, taking into account at the same time the multidimensional structure of the construct. This approach was applied to the analysis of the relationships between observed characteristics and latent trait at different levels (individuals and countries), and across different dimensions using the three-dimensional measure of the FSCRS. Results showed that respondents’ scores were dependent on unobserved (latent class) individual and country membership, the multidimensional structure of the instrument, and justified the use of a multilevel multidimensional finite mixture item response model in the comparative psychological assessment of individuals and countries. Latent class analysis of the FSCRS showed that individual participants and countries could be divided into discrete classes. Along with the previous findings that the FSCRS is psychometrically robust we can recommend using the FSCRS for measuring self-criticism.

Notes

© 2020 Hogrefe Publishing.

ID: 25269117