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A qualitative exploration into the long-term perspectives of patients receiving critical care diaries across the United Kingdom. / O'Gara, Geraldine; Pattison, Natalie.

In: Intensive & critical care nursing, Vol. 36, 01.10.2016, p. 1-7.

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@article{4ac1f817802f45a2a8715e671a403b00,
title = "A qualitative exploration into the long-term perspectives of patients receiving critical care diaries across the United Kingdom",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests the use of a diary with entries by nurses, doctors, AHPs and the patient's family can potentially help by {"}filling in the gaps{"} and help the patient make sense of a time that they have forgotten or feel confused and have fears about.AIMS: A qualitative exploration of the impact of diaries on critical care patients around the United Kingdom in order to describe the long-term effects of patient diaries.METHODS: In-depth qualitative interviews, using principles of grounded theory, via telephone and email were undertaken. The sample included former patients who responded via adverts on critical care charity/support websites. People who had diaries in the previous 1-3 years were asked about their experiences.FINDINGS: Eight people who had been patients in various critical care units across the United Kingdom and who had a critical care diary were interviewed. All reported value in having diaries, however, participants reported needing support when first receiving the diary to understand events that took place in critical care.CONCLUSION: Diaries can offer a means of filing the gaps for patients who struggle with coming to terms with their critical care recovery, but should be given to patients with forethought and subsequent support.",
keywords = "Critical Illness, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Medical Records, Perception, Qualitative Research, United Kingdom, Journal Article",
author = "Geraldine O'Gara and Natalie Pattison",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.iccn.2016.04.006",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "Intensive & critical care nursing",
issn = "0964-3397",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A qualitative exploration into the long-term perspectives of patients receiving critical care diaries across the United Kingdom

AU - O'Gara, Geraldine

AU - Pattison, Natalie

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests the use of a diary with entries by nurses, doctors, AHPs and the patient's family can potentially help by "filling in the gaps" and help the patient make sense of a time that they have forgotten or feel confused and have fears about.AIMS: A qualitative exploration of the impact of diaries on critical care patients around the United Kingdom in order to describe the long-term effects of patient diaries.METHODS: In-depth qualitative interviews, using principles of grounded theory, via telephone and email were undertaken. The sample included former patients who responded via adverts on critical care charity/support websites. People who had diaries in the previous 1-3 years were asked about their experiences.FINDINGS: Eight people who had been patients in various critical care units across the United Kingdom and who had a critical care diary were interviewed. All reported value in having diaries, however, participants reported needing support when first receiving the diary to understand events that took place in critical care.CONCLUSION: Diaries can offer a means of filing the gaps for patients who struggle with coming to terms with their critical care recovery, but should be given to patients with forethought and subsequent support.

AB - BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests the use of a diary with entries by nurses, doctors, AHPs and the patient's family can potentially help by "filling in the gaps" and help the patient make sense of a time that they have forgotten or feel confused and have fears about.AIMS: A qualitative exploration of the impact of diaries on critical care patients around the United Kingdom in order to describe the long-term effects of patient diaries.METHODS: In-depth qualitative interviews, using principles of grounded theory, via telephone and email were undertaken. The sample included former patients who responded via adverts on critical care charity/support websites. People who had diaries in the previous 1-3 years were asked about their experiences.FINDINGS: Eight people who had been patients in various critical care units across the United Kingdom and who had a critical care diary were interviewed. All reported value in having diaries, however, participants reported needing support when first receiving the diary to understand events that took place in critical care.CONCLUSION: Diaries can offer a means of filing the gaps for patients who struggle with coming to terms with their critical care recovery, but should be given to patients with forethought and subsequent support.

KW - Critical Illness

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Intensive Care Units

KW - Male

KW - Medical Records

KW - Perception

KW - Qualitative Research

KW - United Kingdom

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.iccn.2016.04.006

DO - 10.1016/j.iccn.2016.04.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 27287736

VL - 36

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - Intensive & critical care nursing

JF - Intensive & critical care nursing

SN - 0964-3397

ER -