University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

By the same authors

Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome. / Pacella, Valentina; Foulon, Chris; Jenkinson, Paul M; Scandola, Michele; Bertagnoli, Sara; Avesani, Renato; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Moro, Valentina; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel.

In: Elife, Vol. 8, e46075, 06.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Pacella, V, Foulon, C, Jenkinson, PM, Scandola, M, Bertagnoli, S, Avesani, R, Fotopoulou, A, Moro, V & Thiebaut de Schotten, M 2019, 'Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome', Elife, vol. 8, e46075. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.46075

APA

Pacella, V., Foulon, C., Jenkinson, P. M., Scandola, M., Bertagnoli, S., Avesani, R., Fotopoulou, A., Moro, V., & Thiebaut de Schotten, M. (2019). Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome. Elife, 8, [e46075]. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.46075

Vancouver

Pacella V, Foulon C, Jenkinson PM, Scandola M, Bertagnoli S, Avesani R et al. Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome. Elife. 2019 Aug 6;8. e46075. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.46075

Author

Pacella, Valentina ; Foulon, Chris ; Jenkinson, Paul M ; Scandola, Michele ; Bertagnoli, Sara ; Avesani, Renato ; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini ; Moro, Valentina ; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel. / Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome. In: Elife. 2019 ; Vol. 8.

Bibtex

@article{abe9e4b6727e46cba3cc33465600e7b6,
title = "Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome",
abstract = "The syndrome of Anosognosia for Hemiplegia (AHP) can provide unique insights into the neurocognitive processes of motor awareness. Yet, prior studies have only explored predominately discreet lesions. Using advanced structural neuroimaging methods in 174 patients with a right-hemisphere stroke, we were able to identify three neural systems that contribute to AHP, when disconnected or directly damaged: the (i) premotor loop (ii) limbic system, and (iii) ventral attentional network. Our results suggest that human motor awareness is contingent on the joint contribution of these three systems.",
author = "Valentina Pacella and Chris Foulon and Jenkinson, {Paul M} and Michele Scandola and Sara Bertagnoli and Renato Avesani and Aikaterini Fotopoulou and Valentina Moro and {Thiebaut de Schotten}, Michel",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2019 Pacella et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.",
year = "2019",
month = aug,
day = "6",
doi = "10.7554/eLife.46075",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Elife",
issn = "2050-084X",
publisher = "eLife Sciences Publications",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anosognosia for hemiplegia as a tripartite disconnection syndrome

AU - Pacella, Valentina

AU - Foulon, Chris

AU - Jenkinson, Paul M

AU - Scandola, Michele

AU - Bertagnoli, Sara

AU - Avesani, Renato

AU - Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

AU - Moro, Valentina

AU - Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel

N1 - © 2019 Pacella et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

PY - 2019/8/6

Y1 - 2019/8/6

N2 - The syndrome of Anosognosia for Hemiplegia (AHP) can provide unique insights into the neurocognitive processes of motor awareness. Yet, prior studies have only explored predominately discreet lesions. Using advanced structural neuroimaging methods in 174 patients with a right-hemisphere stroke, we were able to identify three neural systems that contribute to AHP, when disconnected or directly damaged: the (i) premotor loop (ii) limbic system, and (iii) ventral attentional network. Our results suggest that human motor awareness is contingent on the joint contribution of these three systems.

AB - The syndrome of Anosognosia for Hemiplegia (AHP) can provide unique insights into the neurocognitive processes of motor awareness. Yet, prior studies have only explored predominately discreet lesions. Using advanced structural neuroimaging methods in 174 patients with a right-hemisphere stroke, we were able to identify three neural systems that contribute to AHP, when disconnected or directly damaged: the (i) premotor loop (ii) limbic system, and (iii) ventral attentional network. Our results suggest that human motor awareness is contingent on the joint contribution of these three systems.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071177667&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.7554/eLife.46075

DO - 10.7554/eLife.46075

M3 - Article

C2 - 31383259

VL - 8

JO - Elife

JF - Elife

SN - 2050-084X

M1 - e46075

ER -