University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

From the same journal

‘Another Generation Cometh’: Apocalyptic Endings and New Beginnings in Science Fictional New London(s)

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‘Another Generation Cometh’ : Apocalyptic Endings and New Beginnings in Science Fictional New London(s). / Wheeler, Patricia.

In: Critical Survey, Vol. 25, No. 2, 2013, p. 57-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issuepeer-review

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@article{373b12dc83ef4b69b86232ae457a62c3,
title = "{\textquoteleft}Another Generation Cometh{\textquoteright}: Apocalyptic Endings and New Beginnings in Science Fictional New London(s)",
abstract = "This article looks at the sub-genre of apocalyptic science fiction and explores the ways that a range of contemporary writers engage with natural, climatic disasters and the damage wrought to the planet in the Anthropocene era. The novels under discussion are Maggie Gee's The Flood and The Ice People, Adam Roberts's The Snow, Stephen Baxter's Flood and Stephen Jones's creative compilation Zombie Apocalypse. The novels are analysed as examples of revelatory eschatological and apocalyptic literature that implicitly borrow from canonical religious writings of the past. The article analyses the apocalyptic narratives as predictors of both the end of the world and the coming of a new age. It focuses primarily on the novels' relationship to apocalyptic discontinuity and to end-of-the-world scenarios that are predicated on the forces of nature",
author = "Patricia Wheeler",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.3167/cs.2013.250205",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "57--70",
journal = "Critical Survey",
issn = "0011-1570",
publisher = "Berghahn Books",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘Another Generation Cometh’

T2 - Apocalyptic Endings and New Beginnings in Science Fictional New London(s)

AU - Wheeler, Patricia

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This article looks at the sub-genre of apocalyptic science fiction and explores the ways that a range of contemporary writers engage with natural, climatic disasters and the damage wrought to the planet in the Anthropocene era. The novels under discussion are Maggie Gee's The Flood and The Ice People, Adam Roberts's The Snow, Stephen Baxter's Flood and Stephen Jones's creative compilation Zombie Apocalypse. The novels are analysed as examples of revelatory eschatological and apocalyptic literature that implicitly borrow from canonical religious writings of the past. The article analyses the apocalyptic narratives as predictors of both the end of the world and the coming of a new age. It focuses primarily on the novels' relationship to apocalyptic discontinuity and to end-of-the-world scenarios that are predicated on the forces of nature

AB - This article looks at the sub-genre of apocalyptic science fiction and explores the ways that a range of contemporary writers engage with natural, climatic disasters and the damage wrought to the planet in the Anthropocene era. The novels under discussion are Maggie Gee's The Flood and The Ice People, Adam Roberts's The Snow, Stephen Baxter's Flood and Stephen Jones's creative compilation Zombie Apocalypse. The novels are analysed as examples of revelatory eschatological and apocalyptic literature that implicitly borrow from canonical religious writings of the past. The article analyses the apocalyptic narratives as predictors of both the end of the world and the coming of a new age. It focuses primarily on the novels' relationship to apocalyptic discontinuity and to end-of-the-world scenarios that are predicated on the forces of nature

U2 - 10.3167/cs.2013.250205

DO - 10.3167/cs.2013.250205

M3 - Special issue

VL - 25

SP - 57

EP - 70

JO - Critical Survey

JF - Critical Survey

SN - 0011-1570

IS - 2

ER -