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Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. / Khan, Nazish; Mamas, Mamas A.; Moss, Alexandra; Gorog, Diana A.; Nightingale, Peter; Armesilla, Angel; Smallwood, Andrew; Munir, Shahzad; Khogali, Saib; Wrigley, Ben; Cotton, James M.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 196, 10.09.2020, p. 523-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Harvard

Khan, N, Mamas, MA, Moss, A, Gorog, DA, Nightingale, P, Armesilla, A, Smallwood, A, Munir, S, Khogali, S, Wrigley, B & Cotton, JM 2020, 'Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients', Thrombosis Research, vol. 196, pp. 523-525. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2020.09.011

APA

Khan, N., Mamas, M. A., Moss, A., Gorog, D. A., Nightingale, P., Armesilla, A., Smallwood, A., Munir, S., Khogali, S., Wrigley, B., & Cotton, J. M. (2020). Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. Thrombosis Research, 196, 523-525. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2020.09.011

Vancouver

Author

Khan, Nazish ; Mamas, Mamas A. ; Moss, Alexandra ; Gorog, Diana A. ; Nightingale, Peter ; Armesilla, Angel ; Smallwood, Andrew ; Munir, Shahzad ; Khogali, Saib ; Wrigley, Ben ; Cotton, James M. / Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. In: Thrombosis Research. 2020 ; Vol. 196. pp. 523-525.

Bibtex

@article{7036687d699a4b678fb12ab3caa18892,
title = "Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients",
abstract = "Aspirin, the most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agent in clinical practice, forms a cornerstone of management in patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD). The clinical efficacy and safety of aspirin when prescribed for secondary prevention is supported by a robust evidence base demonstrating a 24% reduction in mortality and a 25% reduction in serious adverse events without any increase in bleeding complications in the context of an acute myocardial infarction [ 1 ]. Nevertheless, numerous studies have shown that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin is not uniform and is often sub-optimal in a sizable proportion of patients [ 2 , 3 ]. Inadequate platelet inhibition following the administration of aspirin is associated with recurrent cardiovascular events and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease [ 2 ].",
keywords = "Aspirin resistance, Mortality, NSTEMI",
author = "Nazish Khan and Mamas, {Mamas A.} and Alexandra Moss and Gorog, {Diana A.} and Peter Nightingale and Angel Armesilla and Andrew Smallwood and Shahzad Munir and Saib Khogali and Ben Wrigley and Cotton, {James M.}",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.thromres.2020.09.011",
language = "English",
volume = "196",
pages = "523--525",
journal = "Thrombosis Research",
issn = "0049-3848",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aspirin related platelet reactivity as a determinant of ten year survival in high risk non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients

AU - Khan, Nazish

AU - Mamas, Mamas A.

AU - Moss, Alexandra

AU - Gorog, Diana A.

AU - Nightingale, Peter

AU - Armesilla, Angel

AU - Smallwood, Andrew

AU - Munir, Shahzad

AU - Khogali, Saib

AU - Wrigley, Ben

AU - Cotton, James M.

PY - 2020/9/10

Y1 - 2020/9/10

N2 - Aspirin, the most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agent in clinical practice, forms a cornerstone of management in patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD). The clinical efficacy and safety of aspirin when prescribed for secondary prevention is supported by a robust evidence base demonstrating a 24% reduction in mortality and a 25% reduction in serious adverse events without any increase in bleeding complications in the context of an acute myocardial infarction [ 1 ]. Nevertheless, numerous studies have shown that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin is not uniform and is often sub-optimal in a sizable proportion of patients [ 2 , 3 ]. Inadequate platelet inhibition following the administration of aspirin is associated with recurrent cardiovascular events and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease [ 2 ].

AB - Aspirin, the most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agent in clinical practice, forms a cornerstone of management in patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD). The clinical efficacy and safety of aspirin when prescribed for secondary prevention is supported by a robust evidence base demonstrating a 24% reduction in mortality and a 25% reduction in serious adverse events without any increase in bleeding complications in the context of an acute myocardial infarction [ 1 ]. Nevertheless, numerous studies have shown that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin is not uniform and is often sub-optimal in a sizable proportion of patients [ 2 , 3 ]. Inadequate platelet inhibition following the administration of aspirin is associated with recurrent cardiovascular events and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease [ 2 ].

KW - Aspirin resistance

KW - Mortality

KW - NSTEMI

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85093663764&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.thromres.2020.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.thromres.2020.09.011

M3 - Letter

AN - SCOPUS:85093663764

VL - 196

SP - 523

EP - 525

JO - Thrombosis Research

JF - Thrombosis Research

SN - 0049-3848

ER -