University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Authentication v Certification

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Standard

Authentication v Certification. / Low, M.R.; Christianson, B.

University of Hertfordshire, 1995. (UH Computer Science Technical Report; Vol. 216).

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Harvard

Low, MR & Christianson, B 1995, Authentication v Certification. UH Computer Science Technical Report, vol. 216, University of Hertfordshire.

APA

Low, M. R., & Christianson, B. (1995). Authentication v Certification. (UH Computer Science Technical Report; Vol. 216). University of Hertfordshire.

Vancouver

Low MR, Christianson B. Authentication v Certification. University of Hertfordshire, 1995. (UH Computer Science Technical Report).

Author

Low, M.R. ; Christianson, B. / Authentication v Certification. University of Hertfordshire, 1995. (UH Computer Science Technical Report).

Bibtex

@book{1ede1fc42ca047968f1c1007bd441577,
title = "Authentication v Certification",
abstract = "Authentication servers and certification authorities are usually viewed simply as alternative ways of providing the same service. In this paper we show that the differences in the natures of these two approaches are more subtle than is commonly assumed. We argue that, because of these differences, there are many benefits to be gained from employing a protection scheme based on a certification authority rather than an authentication server and that these benefits can, in many applications, outweigh the higher costs in performance associated with a public key certification authority.",
author = "M.R. Low and B. Christianson",
year = "1995",
language = "English",
series = "UH Computer Science Technical Report",
publisher = "University of Hertfordshire",

}

RIS

TY - BOOK

T1 - Authentication v Certification

AU - Low, M.R.

AU - Christianson, B.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Authentication servers and certification authorities are usually viewed simply as alternative ways of providing the same service. In this paper we show that the differences in the natures of these two approaches are more subtle than is commonly assumed. We argue that, because of these differences, there are many benefits to be gained from employing a protection scheme based on a certification authority rather than an authentication server and that these benefits can, in many applications, outweigh the higher costs in performance associated with a public key certification authority.

AB - Authentication servers and certification authorities are usually viewed simply as alternative ways of providing the same service. In this paper we show that the differences in the natures of these two approaches are more subtle than is commonly assumed. We argue that, because of these differences, there are many benefits to be gained from employing a protection scheme based on a certification authority rather than an authentication server and that these benefits can, in many applications, outweigh the higher costs in performance associated with a public key certification authority.

M3 - Other report

T3 - UH Computer Science Technical Report

BT - Authentication v Certification

PB - University of Hertfordshire

ER -