University of Hertfordshire

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Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations. / Campbell, F.E.

University of Hertfordshire, 2010. (UHBS Working Paper).

Research output: Working paper

Harvard

Campbell, FE 2010 'Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations' UHBS Working Paper, University of Hertfordshire.

APA

Campbell, F. E. (2010). Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations. (UHBS Working Paper). University of Hertfordshire.

Vancouver

Campbell FE. Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations. University of Hertfordshire. 2010. (UHBS Working Paper).

Author

Campbell, F.E. / Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations. University of Hertfordshire, 2010. (UHBS Working Paper).

Bibtex

@techreport{3e054970681a4e8a96754e72c9e772bb,
title = "Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations",
abstract = "Public relations plays a sensitive role in dealing with the discomfort felt within organisations about the ethical implications of their operations. Organisational discomfort seems to be on the increase, and this may be as a result of demands for greater transparency. The purpose of public relations is to tell an organisation‟s side of the story. This role is mission critical, yet practitioners do not necessarily have the status to enable them to carry it out effectively. The practice appears to take on organisations‟ discomfort and deal with it by justifying decisions in which it has no part. Blatant attempts to mask the source of discomfort do not work, but they seem to be commonplace. Practitioners often seem to find themselves with their backs to the wall. Blaming the media may make them feel less uncomfortable. Practitioners seem to keep quiet about this aspect of their work, and it may be seen as valuable, especially when the discomfort is the leader‟s own. Practitioners seem to need to believe completely in what the organisation is doing, otherwise they could not bear the discomfort. It is not acknowledged. It could be a cause of “essential dissonance” (Berger 2005) within the field. Seen this way, the discomfort in and around public relations appears to be endemic.",
author = "F.E. Campbell",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
series = "UHBS Working Paper",
publisher = "University of Hertfordshire",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "University of Hertfordshire",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations

AU - Campbell, F.E.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Public relations plays a sensitive role in dealing with the discomfort felt within organisations about the ethical implications of their operations. Organisational discomfort seems to be on the increase, and this may be as a result of demands for greater transparency. The purpose of public relations is to tell an organisation‟s side of the story. This role is mission critical, yet practitioners do not necessarily have the status to enable them to carry it out effectively. The practice appears to take on organisations‟ discomfort and deal with it by justifying decisions in which it has no part. Blatant attempts to mask the source of discomfort do not work, but they seem to be commonplace. Practitioners often seem to find themselves with their backs to the wall. Blaming the media may make them feel less uncomfortable. Practitioners seem to keep quiet about this aspect of their work, and it may be seen as valuable, especially when the discomfort is the leader‟s own. Practitioners seem to need to believe completely in what the organisation is doing, otherwise they could not bear the discomfort. It is not acknowledged. It could be a cause of “essential dissonance” (Berger 2005) within the field. Seen this way, the discomfort in and around public relations appears to be endemic.

AB - Public relations plays a sensitive role in dealing with the discomfort felt within organisations about the ethical implications of their operations. Organisational discomfort seems to be on the increase, and this may be as a result of demands for greater transparency. The purpose of public relations is to tell an organisation‟s side of the story. This role is mission critical, yet practitioners do not necessarily have the status to enable them to carry it out effectively. The practice appears to take on organisations‟ discomfort and deal with it by justifying decisions in which it has no part. Blatant attempts to mask the source of discomfort do not work, but they seem to be commonplace. Practitioners often seem to find themselves with their backs to the wall. Blaming the media may make them feel less uncomfortable. Practitioners seem to keep quiet about this aspect of their work, and it may be seen as valuable, especially when the discomfort is the leader‟s own. Practitioners seem to need to believe completely in what the organisation is doing, otherwise they could not bear the discomfort. It is not acknowledged. It could be a cause of “essential dissonance” (Berger 2005) within the field. Seen this way, the discomfort in and around public relations appears to be endemic.

M3 - Working paper

T3 - UHBS Working Paper

BT - Backs to the Wall: How Public Relations Carries Discomfort for Organisations

PB - University of Hertfordshire

ER -