University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

Big data and their epistemological challenge [editor letter]

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  • L. Floridi
View graph of relations
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-437
Number of pages3
JournalPhilosophy and Technology
Volume25
Issue4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Abstract

It is estimated that humanity accumulated 180 EB of data between the invention of writing and 2006. Between 2006 and 2011, the total grew ten times and reached 1,600 EB. This figure is now expected to grow fourfold approximately every 3 years. Every day, enough new data are being generated to fill all US libraries eight times over. As a result, there is much talk about “big data”. This special issue on “Evolution, Genetic Engineering and Human Enhancement”, for example, would have been inconceivable in an age of “small data”, simply because genetics is one of the data-greediest sciences around. This is why, in the USA, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have identified big data as a programme focus. One of the main NSF–NIH interagency initiatives addresses the need for core techniques and technologies for advancing big data science and engineering (see NSF-12-499). [opening paragraph]

ID: 2021645