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Cardiovascular risk estimation - What is missing?

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Cardiovascular risk estimation - What is missing? / Kirby, M.

In: International Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 65, No. 2, 2011, p. 111-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{796e867e2e2545d5a03ec084cfe36c1f,
title = "Cardiovascular risk estimation - What is missing?",
abstract = "The review paper by Kevin Billups et al. (1) in this issue of the journal is set against a backdrop of the fact that cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the world{\textquoteright}s major cause of death. It was responsible for one-third of total global deaths in 2001, and the expectation is that by 2010 its continuing increase in incidence will result in it far exceeding all other causes of death and disability (2). Those of us living in developed countries have been facing this problem for many years. It is also clear that cardiovascular mortality is rising exponentially in developing countries, largely due to changes in lifestyle such as poor dietary habits and lack of exercise leading to obesity. Smoking prevalence is also high in these countries. Ethnic minorities in developed countries have been shown to be at increased risk for CVD (3,4).",
keywords = "Cardiovascular",
author = "M. Kirby",
note = "Original article can be found at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com Copyright Wiley-Blackwell [Full text of this article is not available in the UHRA]",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1111/j.1742-1241.2010.02602.x",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "111--113",
journal = "International Journal of Clinical Practice",
issn = "1368-5031",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiovascular risk estimation - What is missing?

AU - Kirby, M.

N1 - Original article can be found at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com Copyright Wiley-Blackwell [Full text of this article is not available in the UHRA]

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - The review paper by Kevin Billups et al. (1) in this issue of the journal is set against a backdrop of the fact that cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the world’s major cause of death. It was responsible for one-third of total global deaths in 2001, and the expectation is that by 2010 its continuing increase in incidence will result in it far exceeding all other causes of death and disability (2). Those of us living in developed countries have been facing this problem for many years. It is also clear that cardiovascular mortality is rising exponentially in developing countries, largely due to changes in lifestyle such as poor dietary habits and lack of exercise leading to obesity. Smoking prevalence is also high in these countries. Ethnic minorities in developed countries have been shown to be at increased risk for CVD (3,4).

AB - The review paper by Kevin Billups et al. (1) in this issue of the journal is set against a backdrop of the fact that cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the world’s major cause of death. It was responsible for one-third of total global deaths in 2001, and the expectation is that by 2010 its continuing increase in incidence will result in it far exceeding all other causes of death and disability (2). Those of us living in developed countries have been facing this problem for many years. It is also clear that cardiovascular mortality is rising exponentially in developing countries, largely due to changes in lifestyle such as poor dietary habits and lack of exercise leading to obesity. Smoking prevalence is also high in these countries. Ethnic minorities in developed countries have been shown to be at increased risk for CVD (3,4).

KW - Cardiovascular

U2 - 10.1111/j.1742-1241.2010.02602.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1742-1241.2010.02602.x

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 111

EP - 113

JO - International Journal of Clinical Practice

JF - International Journal of Clinical Practice

SN - 1368-5031

IS - 2

ER -