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Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam. / Goerke, Marissa; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Ritter, Georg; Hesse, Evelyn; Neely, Ryan; Taylor, Laurence; Stillwell, Robert; Kaye, Paul.

In: Applied Optics, Vol. 56, No. 19, 01.07.2017, p. G188-G196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Goerke, M, Ulanowski, Z, Ritter, G, Hesse, E, Neely, R, Taylor, L, Stillwell, R & Kaye, P 2017, 'Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam', Applied Optics, vol. 56, no. 19, pp. G188-G196. https://doi.org/10.1364/AO.56.00G188

APA

Goerke, M., Ulanowski, Z., Ritter, G., Hesse, E., Neely, R., Taylor, L., Stillwell, R., & Kaye, P. (2017). Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam. Applied Optics, 56(19), G188-G196. https://doi.org/10.1364/AO.56.00G188

Vancouver

Author

Goerke, Marissa ; Ulanowski, Zbigniew ; Ritter, Georg ; Hesse, Evelyn ; Neely, Ryan ; Taylor, Laurence ; Stillwell, Robert ; Kaye, Paul. / Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam. In: Applied Optics. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 19. pp. G188-G196.

Bibtex

@article{3b8f64707c394be2bb13bfdeaf24b7cd,
title = "Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam",
abstract = "We report a phenomenon manifesting itself as brief flashes of light on the snow surface near a lidar beam. The flashes are imaged and interpreted as specular reflection patterns from individual ice particles. Such patterns have two-dimensional structure, and are similar to those previously observed in forward scattering. Patterns are easiest to capture from particles with well-defined horizontal facets, such as near-horizontally aligned plates. The patterns and their position can be used to determine properties such as ice particle shape, size, roughness, alignment and altitude. Data obtained at Summit in Greenland shows the presence of regular hexagonal and scalene plates, columns and rounded plates of various sizes, among others.",
keywords = "Atmospheric optics, Scattering, Remote sensing, Ice crystals, Speckle",
author = "Marissa Goerke and Zbigniew Ulanowski and Georg Ritter and Evelyn Hesse and Ryan Neely and Laurence Taylor and Robert Stillwell and Paul Kaye",
note = "This is an Open Access article published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article{\textquoteright}s title, journal citation, and DOI. {\textcopyright} 2017 Optical Society of America.",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1364/AO.56.00G188",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "G188--G196",
journal = "Applied Optics",
issn = "0003-6935",
publisher = "The Optical Society",
number = "19",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing ice particles using two-dimensional reflections of a lidar beam

AU - Goerke, Marissa

AU - Ulanowski, Zbigniew

AU - Ritter, Georg

AU - Hesse, Evelyn

AU - Neely, Ryan

AU - Taylor, Laurence

AU - Stillwell, Robert

AU - Kaye, Paul

N1 - This is an Open Access article published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal citation, and DOI. © 2017 Optical Society of America.

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - We report a phenomenon manifesting itself as brief flashes of light on the snow surface near a lidar beam. The flashes are imaged and interpreted as specular reflection patterns from individual ice particles. Such patterns have two-dimensional structure, and are similar to those previously observed in forward scattering. Patterns are easiest to capture from particles with well-defined horizontal facets, such as near-horizontally aligned plates. The patterns and their position can be used to determine properties such as ice particle shape, size, roughness, alignment and altitude. Data obtained at Summit in Greenland shows the presence of regular hexagonal and scalene plates, columns and rounded plates of various sizes, among others.

AB - We report a phenomenon manifesting itself as brief flashes of light on the snow surface near a lidar beam. The flashes are imaged and interpreted as specular reflection patterns from individual ice particles. Such patterns have two-dimensional structure, and are similar to those previously observed in forward scattering. Patterns are easiest to capture from particles with well-defined horizontal facets, such as near-horizontally aligned plates. The patterns and their position can be used to determine properties such as ice particle shape, size, roughness, alignment and altitude. Data obtained at Summit in Greenland shows the presence of regular hexagonal and scalene plates, columns and rounded plates of various sizes, among others.

KW - Atmospheric optics

KW - Scattering

KW - Remote sensing

KW - Ice crystals

KW - Speckle

U2 - 10.1364/AO.56.00G188

DO - 10.1364/AO.56.00G188

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - G188-G196

JO - Applied Optics

JF - Applied Optics

SN - 0003-6935

IS - 19

ER -