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@article{7c663f66eafe47dfbcb182d0e60b38f6,
title = "Creative dance as experiential learning in state primary education: The Potential Benefits for Children",
abstract = "Background: Taking the UK National Curriculum as an example, creative dance is part of physical education classified as a foundation subject rather than an important core subject. Purpose: The article{\textquoteright}s primary aim is to examine a range of literature exploring any potential benefits of the role of creative dance for children aged 3-11 years in mainstream state education to evaluate whether creative dance can be categorised as experiential learning. Methodology/Approach: The search included key words in several data bases. The analysis arrived at some potential benefits which can be framed within experiential learning. Findings /Conclusion: This section identifies some benefits of creative dance in socio-emotional, arts-based, transferable, embodied, physical, and cognitive learning. It concludes that conceptualising creative dance as experiential learning could support the consideration of it filling a more central role in the curriculum. Implications: This article breaks new ground in experiential learning re-contextualising the role of creative dance in children{\textquoteright}s learning through reviewing some related literature. There is a claim to be made for creative dance to play a more central role in the curriculum when the benefits and its process are framed as experiential learning. ",
keywords = "primary education, Children, National Curriculum, experiential learning, creative dance, benfits",
author = "Helen Payne and Barry Costas",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage). ",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "3",
doi = "10.1177/1053825920968587",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Experiential Education",
issn = "1053-8259",
publisher = "Sage",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Creative dance as experiential learning in state primary education: The Potential Benefits for Children

AU - Payne, Helen

AU - Costas, Barry

N1 - © The Author(s) 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).

PY - 2020/11/3

Y1 - 2020/11/3

N2 - Background: Taking the UK National Curriculum as an example, creative dance is part of physical education classified as a foundation subject rather than an important core subject. Purpose: The article’s primary aim is to examine a range of literature exploring any potential benefits of the role of creative dance for children aged 3-11 years in mainstream state education to evaluate whether creative dance can be categorised as experiential learning. Methodology/Approach: The search included key words in several data bases. The analysis arrived at some potential benefits which can be framed within experiential learning. Findings /Conclusion: This section identifies some benefits of creative dance in socio-emotional, arts-based, transferable, embodied, physical, and cognitive learning. It concludes that conceptualising creative dance as experiential learning could support the consideration of it filling a more central role in the curriculum. Implications: This article breaks new ground in experiential learning re-contextualising the role of creative dance in children’s learning through reviewing some related literature. There is a claim to be made for creative dance to play a more central role in the curriculum when the benefits and its process are framed as experiential learning.

AB - Background: Taking the UK National Curriculum as an example, creative dance is part of physical education classified as a foundation subject rather than an important core subject. Purpose: The article’s primary aim is to examine a range of literature exploring any potential benefits of the role of creative dance for children aged 3-11 years in mainstream state education to evaluate whether creative dance can be categorised as experiential learning. Methodology/Approach: The search included key words in several data bases. The analysis arrived at some potential benefits which can be framed within experiential learning. Findings /Conclusion: This section identifies some benefits of creative dance in socio-emotional, arts-based, transferable, embodied, physical, and cognitive learning. It concludes that conceptualising creative dance as experiential learning could support the consideration of it filling a more central role in the curriculum. Implications: This article breaks new ground in experiential learning re-contextualising the role of creative dance in children’s learning through reviewing some related literature. There is a claim to be made for creative dance to play a more central role in the curriculum when the benefits and its process are framed as experiential learning.

KW - primary education

KW - Children

KW - National Curriculum

KW - experiential learning

KW - creative dance

KW - benfits

U2 - 10.1177/1053825920968587

DO - 10.1177/1053825920968587

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Experiential Education

JF - Journal of Experiential Education

SN - 1053-8259

ER -