University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Democratic Legitimacy and the Competence Obligation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

View graph of relations
Original languageEnglish
JournalMoral Philosophy and Politics
Early online date11 Mar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Mar 2020

Abstract

What obligations are there on voters? This paper argues that voters should make their electoral decision competently, and does so by developing on a recent proposal for democratic legitimacy. It then explores three problems arising from this ‘competency obligation’. First, how should voters be competent? I propose three conditions required for voter competence. Second, how competent should voters be? I argue that that the competency required tracks the significance of the consequences of the vote. The threshold for competency can therefore be high or low. Third, if the electorate are unlikely to deliver a competent decision, should suffrage be restricted to the competent alone? I defend unrestricted suffrage on the grounds that restricting suffrage cannot guarantee a competently made electoral decision. Instead, obligations on voters should be minimised by political parties satisfying their obligations to be politically sound; if they are sound, then the obligation to be competent can be easily satisfied by voters.

Notes

© 2020 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston: https://doi.org/10.1515/mopp-2019-0036.

ID: 18716970