University of Hertfordshire

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  • Detlef Mueller
  • Youngmin Noh
  • Kyunghwa Lee
  • Kwanchul Kim
  • KwonHo Lee
  • Atsushi Shimizu
  • Sang-Woo Kim
  • Itaru Sano
  • Chan Bong Park
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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6271-6290
JournalAtmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume17
Issue10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 May 2017

Abstract

The linear particle depolarization ratios at 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm were derived using data taken with the AERONET sun–sky radiometer at Seoul (37.45° N, 126.95° E), Kongju (36.47° N, 127.14° E), Gosan (33.29° N, 126.16° E), and Osaka (34.65° N, 135.59° E). The results are compared to the linear particle depolarization ratio measured by lidar at 532 nm. The correlation coefficient R2 between the linear particle depolarization ratio derived by AERONET data at 1020 nm and the linear particle depolarization ratio measured with lidar at 532 nm is 0.90, 0.92, 0.79, and 0.89 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the lidar-measured depolarization ratio at 532 nm and that retrieved by AERONET at 870 nm are 0.89, 0.92, 0.76, and 0.88 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. The correlation coefficients for the data taken at 675 nm are lower than the correlation coefficients at 870 and 1020 nm, respectively. Values are 0.81, 0.90, 0.64, and 0.81 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. The lowest correlation values are found for the AERONET-derived linear particle depolarization ratio at 440 nm, i.e., 0.38, 0.62, 0.26, and 0.28 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. We should expect a higher correlation between lidar-measured linear particle depolarization ratios at 532 nm and the ones derived from AERONET at 675 and 440 nm as the lidar wavelength is between the two AERONET wavelengths. We cannot currently explain why we find better correlation between lidar and AERONET linear particle depolarization ratios for the case that the AERONET wavelengths (675, 870, and 1020 nm) are significantly larger than the lidar measurement wavelength (532 nm).

The linear particle depolarization ratio can be used as a parameter to obtain insight into the variation of optical and microphysical properties of dust when it is mixed with anthropogenic pollution particles. The single-scattering albedo increases with increasing measurement wavelength for low linear particle depolarization ratios, which indicates a high share of fine-mode anthropogenic pollution. In contrast, single-scattering albedo increases with increasing wavelength for high linear particle depolarization ratios, which indicated a high share of coarse-mode mineral dust particles. The retrieved volume particle size distributions are dominated by the fine-mode fraction if linear particle depolarization ratios are less than 0.15 at 532 nm. The fine-mode fraction of the size distributions decreases and the coarse-mode fraction of the size distribution increases for increasing linear particle depolarization ratio at 1020 nm. The dust ratio based on using the linear particle depolarization ratio derived from AERONET data is 0.12 to 0.17. These values are lower than the coarse-mode fraction derived from the volume concentrations of particle size distributions, in which case we can compute the coarse-mode fraction of dust.

Notes

© Author(s) 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Noh, Y., Müller, D., Lee, K., Kim, K., Lee, K., Shimizu, A., Kim, S.-W., Sano, I., and Park, C. B.: Depolarization ratios retrieved by AERONET sun–sky radiometer data and comparison to depolarization ratios measured with lidar, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6271-6290, doi:10.5194/acp-17-6271-2017, 2017.

ID: 11888817