University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Standard

'Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes. / McMurdo, Shellie.

2018. Paper presented at It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen, Leicester, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Harvard

McMurdo, S 2018, ''Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes', Paper presented at It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen, Leicester, United Kingdom, 13/06/18.

APA

McMurdo, S. (2018). 'Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes. Paper presented at It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen, Leicester, United Kingdom.

Vancouver

McMurdo S. 'Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes. 2018. Paper presented at It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen, Leicester, United Kingdom.

Author

McMurdo, Shellie. / 'Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes. Paper presented at It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen, Leicester, United Kingdom.

Bibtex

@conference{e040049cfbeb439e87e52778adaf86fe,
title = "'Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes",
abstract = "The Poughkeepsie Tapes adheres to found footage horror{\textquoteright}s central conceit, in its blurring of fact and fiction, and this paper will examine how this was inadvertently aided by the film{\textquoteright}s troubled release, which gave rise to myths that the footage included in the film was real, or at the very least {\textquoteleft}too extreme{\textquoteright} for audiences (Whittaker, 2017).The Poughkeepsie Tapes was {\textquoteleft}almost{\textquoteright} released in 2007, and although briefly available online, it was not until 2017 that the film could finally be seen by a wider audience through Scream Factory{\textquoteright}s Blu-Ray release. This paper will begin therefore by exploring how The Poughkeepsie Tapes occupies a dual space in recent horror genre history, both in the year of its production, and the year of its delayed release, and demonstrate how the film resonates within both contexts.Using Mark Seltzer{\textquoteright}s concept of {\textquoteleft}wound culture{\textquoteright} (2013: 2), this paper will relate The Poughkeepsie Tapes to the recent renaissance of true crime television, and in doing so will elucidate a link between the film and the drive towards capturing the “real” that has been evident in recent popular culture. Additionally, this paper will examine the film{\textquoteright}s use of a low-fi VHS aesthetic in its narrative, both evoking nostalgia for the VHS era, and acting as an emulation of what an audience might imagine real snuff footage would look like. Finally, this paper will demonstrate how the film resonates presciently with the emergence of real death websites, which make watching real death an accessible reality online.",
author = "Shellie McMurdo",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
note = "It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen ; Conference date: 13-06-2018",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - 'Do you wanna see what the other side of the camera looks like?': Examining Snuff Aesthetics in The Poughkeepsie Tapes

AU - McMurdo, Shellie

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The Poughkeepsie Tapes adheres to found footage horror’s central conceit, in its blurring of fact and fiction, and this paper will examine how this was inadvertently aided by the film’s troubled release, which gave rise to myths that the footage included in the film was real, or at the very least ‘too extreme’ for audiences (Whittaker, 2017).The Poughkeepsie Tapes was ‘almost’ released in 2007, and although briefly available online, it was not until 2017 that the film could finally be seen by a wider audience through Scream Factory’s Blu-Ray release. This paper will begin therefore by exploring how The Poughkeepsie Tapes occupies a dual space in recent horror genre history, both in the year of its production, and the year of its delayed release, and demonstrate how the film resonates within both contexts.Using Mark Seltzer’s concept of ‘wound culture’ (2013: 2), this paper will relate The Poughkeepsie Tapes to the recent renaissance of true crime television, and in doing so will elucidate a link between the film and the drive towards capturing the “real” that has been evident in recent popular culture. Additionally, this paper will examine the film’s use of a low-fi VHS aesthetic in its narrative, both evoking nostalgia for the VHS era, and acting as an emulation of what an audience might imagine real snuff footage would look like. Finally, this paper will demonstrate how the film resonates presciently with the emergence of real death websites, which make watching real death an accessible reality online.

AB - The Poughkeepsie Tapes adheres to found footage horror’s central conceit, in its blurring of fact and fiction, and this paper will examine how this was inadvertently aided by the film’s troubled release, which gave rise to myths that the footage included in the film was real, or at the very least ‘too extreme’ for audiences (Whittaker, 2017).The Poughkeepsie Tapes was ‘almost’ released in 2007, and although briefly available online, it was not until 2017 that the film could finally be seen by a wider audience through Scream Factory’s Blu-Ray release. This paper will begin therefore by exploring how The Poughkeepsie Tapes occupies a dual space in recent horror genre history, both in the year of its production, and the year of its delayed release, and demonstrate how the film resonates within both contexts.Using Mark Seltzer’s concept of ‘wound culture’ (2013: 2), this paper will relate The Poughkeepsie Tapes to the recent renaissance of true crime television, and in doing so will elucidate a link between the film and the drive towards capturing the “real” that has been evident in recent popular culture. Additionally, this paper will examine the film’s use of a low-fi VHS aesthetic in its narrative, both evoking nostalgia for the VHS era, and acting as an emulation of what an audience might imagine real snuff footage would look like. Finally, this paper will demonstrate how the film resonates presciently with the emergence of real death websites, which make watching real death an accessible reality online.

M3 - Paper

T2 - It Is True, We Shall Be Monsters: New Perspectives on Horror, Science Fiction and the Monstrous Onscreen

Y2 - 13 June 2018

ER -