University of Hertfordshire

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Enhancing resilience and self-efficacy in the parents of children with disabilities and complex health needs. / Whiting, Mark; Nash, Avril; Kendall, Sally; Roberts, Sheila.

In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, Vol. 20, No. e33, 11.04.2019, p. 1-7.

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@article{b69fd06901d5491c9a2592f1ff8a19d3,
title = "Enhancing resilience and self-efficacy in the parents of children with disabilities and complex health needs",
abstract = "AimThe principal aim of this study was to develop, pilot and evaluate an intervention intended to support the development of resilience and self-efficacy in parents of children with disabilities or complex health needs.BackgroundPrevious research has found that families often experience physical, social and emotional stress in the context of living with and caring for their disabled child. The literature indicates that a key factor in determining how well the parents of these children cope with their situation may be how resilient and self-efficacious they are.MethodsA total of 16 parents of children with complex needs and disabilities were engaged in a series of guided conversations delivered during six contact visits with nurse co-researchers (community children{\textquoteright}s nurses who had received an intensive three-day preparation programme). The conversations, which were supported with additional material that was designed specifically for use in the study, were based around four key themes: emotional coping, practical coping, support networks and {\textquoteleft}you and your child{\textquoteright}. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative measures.FindingsWhen interviewed, parents reported increased self-belief and self-confidence and indicated that they felt better supported and stronger as a result of the intervention. This was consistent with the quantitative evaluation which identified significant improvements on scores for active coping and self-blame on the brief COPE inventory scale and for empathy and understanding and self-acceptance on the TOPSE scale. Scores on the self-report distress thermometer demonstrated a significant reduction in self-reported distress scores at the end of the intervention period.",
keywords = "children, complex health needs, disability, parenting, resilience, self-efficacy",
author = "Mark Whiting and Avril Nash and Sally Kendall and Sheila Roberts",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2019.",
year = "2019",
month = apr,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1017/S1463423619000112",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "Primary Health Care Research and Development",
issn = "1463-4236",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "e33",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enhancing resilience and self-efficacy in the parents of children with disabilities and complex health needs

AU - Whiting, Mark

AU - Nash, Avril

AU - Kendall, Sally

AU - Roberts, Sheila

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019.

PY - 2019/4/11

Y1 - 2019/4/11

N2 - AimThe principal aim of this study was to develop, pilot and evaluate an intervention intended to support the development of resilience and self-efficacy in parents of children with disabilities or complex health needs.BackgroundPrevious research has found that families often experience physical, social and emotional stress in the context of living with and caring for their disabled child. The literature indicates that a key factor in determining how well the parents of these children cope with their situation may be how resilient and self-efficacious they are.MethodsA total of 16 parents of children with complex needs and disabilities were engaged in a series of guided conversations delivered during six contact visits with nurse co-researchers (community children’s nurses who had received an intensive three-day preparation programme). The conversations, which were supported with additional material that was designed specifically for use in the study, were based around four key themes: emotional coping, practical coping, support networks and ‘you and your child’. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative measures.FindingsWhen interviewed, parents reported increased self-belief and self-confidence and indicated that they felt better supported and stronger as a result of the intervention. This was consistent with the quantitative evaluation which identified significant improvements on scores for active coping and self-blame on the brief COPE inventory scale and for empathy and understanding and self-acceptance on the TOPSE scale. Scores on the self-report distress thermometer demonstrated a significant reduction in self-reported distress scores at the end of the intervention period.

AB - AimThe principal aim of this study was to develop, pilot and evaluate an intervention intended to support the development of resilience and self-efficacy in parents of children with disabilities or complex health needs.BackgroundPrevious research has found that families often experience physical, social and emotional stress in the context of living with and caring for their disabled child. The literature indicates that a key factor in determining how well the parents of these children cope with their situation may be how resilient and self-efficacious they are.MethodsA total of 16 parents of children with complex needs and disabilities were engaged in a series of guided conversations delivered during six contact visits with nurse co-researchers (community children’s nurses who had received an intensive three-day preparation programme). The conversations, which were supported with additional material that was designed specifically for use in the study, were based around four key themes: emotional coping, practical coping, support networks and ‘you and your child’. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative measures.FindingsWhen interviewed, parents reported increased self-belief and self-confidence and indicated that they felt better supported and stronger as a result of the intervention. This was consistent with the quantitative evaluation which identified significant improvements on scores for active coping and self-blame on the brief COPE inventory scale and for empathy and understanding and self-acceptance on the TOPSE scale. Scores on the self-report distress thermometer demonstrated a significant reduction in self-reported distress scores at the end of the intervention period.

KW - children, complex health needs, disability, parenting, resilience, self-efficacy

U2 - 10.1017/S1463423619000112

DO - 10.1017/S1463423619000112

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - Primary Health Care Research and Development

JF - Primary Health Care Research and Development

SN - 1463-4236

IS - e33

ER -