University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Erik's Effects: The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Standard

Erik's Effects : The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle. / Phillips, Ivan.

2013. Paper presented at Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference), Oxford, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Harvard

Phillips, I 2013, 'Erik's Effects: The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle', Paper presented at Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference), Oxford, United Kingdom, 10/09/12 - 12/09/12.

APA

Phillips, I. (2013). Erik's Effects: The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle. Paper presented at Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference), Oxford, United Kingdom.

Vancouver

Phillips I. Erik's Effects: The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle. 2013. Paper presented at Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference), Oxford, United Kingdom.

Author

Phillips, Ivan. / Erik's Effects : The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle. Paper presented at Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference), Oxford, United Kingdom.11 p.

Bibtex

@conference{4c8a0c24078a417bad84dffbeabf4687,
title = "Erik's Effects: The Phantom, the 'gesamtkunstwerk', and the monstrosity of spectacle",
abstract = "Erik, who is a real monster … is also, in certain respects, a regular child, vain and self-conceited and there is nothing he loves so much as, after astonishing people, to prove the really miraculous ingenuity of his mind{\textquoteright} (Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera) Virginia Woolf famously dated the origins of the modern sensibility to December 1910. This paper, using the idea of the gesamtkunstwerk or {\textquoteleft}total work of art{\textquoteright} as its theoretical starting point, argues that Gaston Leroux{\textquoteright}s The Phantom of the Opera, published in the same year, represents a distinct product of this sensibility. Enacting a compelling narrative of {\textquoteleft}monstrous{\textquoteright} unsettlement within mass culture, the novel — which continues to be critically neglected compared to similar literary horror classics — is one of the iconic monster fictions of the last century. The Opera Ghost, Erik, a grotesque social outcast, is a special effects artist on a grand scale, a fairground magician and inspired architect, as well as a torturer, assassin, and psychotic obsessive. Beneath the Palais Garnier {\textquoteleft}his artistic, fantastic, wizard nature{\textquoteright} creates a world of trapdoors, pulleys and costumes, of smoke and mirrors, of flame effects and water, creating a gesamtkunstwerk within a gesamtkunstwerk. His legacy is a troubled, prophetic and inexhaustible allegory of emergent modernity, in particular of mass media spectacle and shared popular fantasy. As charismatic as he is terrifying, as tragic as he is cruel, this beast in search of beauty — {\textquoteleft}built up of death from head to foot{\textquoteright} — seems to embody both the fear and the fascination of a complex mediated environment. Ultimately, perhaps, the spaces he inhabits offer singular perspectives from which to explore the conditions of the digital present, conditions in which – according to Douglas Kellner – {\textquoteleft}spectacle itself is becoming one of the organizing principles of the economy, polity, society, and everyday life{\textquoteright}.",
keywords = "gothic, gesamtkunstwerk, medium specificity, spectacle, horror, special effects",
author = "Ivan Phillips",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
note = "Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference) ; Conference date: 10-09-2012 Through 12-09-2012",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Erik's Effects

T2 - Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil (10th Global Conference)

AU - Phillips, Ivan

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Erik, who is a real monster … is also, in certain respects, a regular child, vain and self-conceited and there is nothing he loves so much as, after astonishing people, to prove the really miraculous ingenuity of his mind’ (Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera) Virginia Woolf famously dated the origins of the modern sensibility to December 1910. This paper, using the idea of the gesamtkunstwerk or ‘total work of art’ as its theoretical starting point, argues that Gaston Leroux’s The Phantom of the Opera, published in the same year, represents a distinct product of this sensibility. Enacting a compelling narrative of ‘monstrous’ unsettlement within mass culture, the novel — which continues to be critically neglected compared to similar literary horror classics — is one of the iconic monster fictions of the last century. The Opera Ghost, Erik, a grotesque social outcast, is a special effects artist on a grand scale, a fairground magician and inspired architect, as well as a torturer, assassin, and psychotic obsessive. Beneath the Palais Garnier ‘his artistic, fantastic, wizard nature’ creates a world of trapdoors, pulleys and costumes, of smoke and mirrors, of flame effects and water, creating a gesamtkunstwerk within a gesamtkunstwerk. His legacy is a troubled, prophetic and inexhaustible allegory of emergent modernity, in particular of mass media spectacle and shared popular fantasy. As charismatic as he is terrifying, as tragic as he is cruel, this beast in search of beauty — ‘built up of death from head to foot’ — seems to embody both the fear and the fascination of a complex mediated environment. Ultimately, perhaps, the spaces he inhabits offer singular perspectives from which to explore the conditions of the digital present, conditions in which – according to Douglas Kellner – ‘spectacle itself is becoming one of the organizing principles of the economy, polity, society, and everyday life’.

AB - Erik, who is a real monster … is also, in certain respects, a regular child, vain and self-conceited and there is nothing he loves so much as, after astonishing people, to prove the really miraculous ingenuity of his mind’ (Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera) Virginia Woolf famously dated the origins of the modern sensibility to December 1910. This paper, using the idea of the gesamtkunstwerk or ‘total work of art’ as its theoretical starting point, argues that Gaston Leroux’s The Phantom of the Opera, published in the same year, represents a distinct product of this sensibility. Enacting a compelling narrative of ‘monstrous’ unsettlement within mass culture, the novel — which continues to be critically neglected compared to similar literary horror classics — is one of the iconic monster fictions of the last century. The Opera Ghost, Erik, a grotesque social outcast, is a special effects artist on a grand scale, a fairground magician and inspired architect, as well as a torturer, assassin, and psychotic obsessive. Beneath the Palais Garnier ‘his artistic, fantastic, wizard nature’ creates a world of trapdoors, pulleys and costumes, of smoke and mirrors, of flame effects and water, creating a gesamtkunstwerk within a gesamtkunstwerk. His legacy is a troubled, prophetic and inexhaustible allegory of emergent modernity, in particular of mass media spectacle and shared popular fantasy. As charismatic as he is terrifying, as tragic as he is cruel, this beast in search of beauty — ‘built up of death from head to foot’ — seems to embody both the fear and the fascination of a complex mediated environment. Ultimately, perhaps, the spaces he inhabits offer singular perspectives from which to explore the conditions of the digital present, conditions in which – according to Douglas Kellner – ‘spectacle itself is becoming one of the organizing principles of the economy, polity, society, and everyday life’.

KW - gothic, gesamtkunstwerk, medium specificity, spectacle, horror, special effects

M3 - Paper

Y2 - 10 September 2012 through 12 September 2012

ER -