University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

From the same journal

From the same journal

By the same authors

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Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability
Early online date22 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Jul 2020

Abstract

This article is concerned with masterplan implementation and with exploring, via recourse to case studies, slippages between masterplanning principles, policies, and practices. Framed by a growing body of sustainable urbanism literature we analyse evidence from five masterplanned communities in the UK and Australia to comparatively explore how some key theoretical principles are translated into placemaking in inner urban, suburban, outer urban and semi-rural contexts. We observe varying degrees of disjuncture between masterplanning principles and the urban form envisioned by, and realized through, actual masterplanning proposals and implementation. We postulate that various degrees of slippage at each stage from proposals to practices have occurred which can affect capacity to meet principles of sustainable urbanism. Analysis of the five cases demonstrates where some potential “tripping-up” points lie in the masterplanning process, hinting at broader impediments to delivering masterplanning that is more closely aligned to sustainable urbanism principles in future.

Notes

© 2020 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability on 22nd July 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/17549175.2020.1793802.

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