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Haemato-oncology patients' perceptions of health-related quality of life after critical illness : A qualitative phenomenological study. / O'Gara, Geraldine; Tuddenham, Simon; Pattison, Natalie.

In: Intensive & critical care nursing, Vol. 44, 01.02.2018, p. 76-84.

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@article{8656a97eb9b548dc81737518edc02f21,
title = "Haemato-oncology patients' perceptions of health-related quality of life after critical illness: A qualitative phenomenological study",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Haemato-oncology patients often require critical care support due to side-effects of treatment. Discharge can mark the start of an uncertain journey due to the impact of critical illness on health-related quality of life. Qualitatively establishing needs is a priority as current evidence is limited.AIMS: To qualitatively explore perceptions of haemato-oncology patients' health-related quality of life after critical illness and explore how healthcare professionals can provide long-term support.METHODS: Nine in-depth interviews were conducted three to eighteen months post-discharge from critical care. Phenomenology was used to gain deeper understanding of the patients' lived experience.SETTING: A 19-bedded Intensive Care Unit in a specialist cancer centre.FINDINGS: Five major themes emerged: Intensive care as a means to an end; Rollercoaster of illness; Reliance on hospital; Having a realistic/sanguine approach; Living in the moment. Haemato-oncology patients who experience critical illness may view it as a small part of a larger treatment pathway, thus health-related quality of life is impacted by this rather than the acute episode.CONCLUSIONS: Discharge from the intensive care unit can be seen as a positive end-point, allowing personal growth in areas such as relationships and living life to the full. The contribution of health-care professionals and support of significant others is regarded as critical to the recovery experience.",
keywords = "health-related quality of life, Haemato-oncology, critical care, post-traumatic growth, phenomenology",
author = "Geraldine O'Gara and Simon Tuddenham and Natalie Pattison",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.iccn.2017.09.011",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "76--84",
journal = "Intensive & critical care nursing",
issn = "0964-3397",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Haemato-oncology patients' perceptions of health-related quality of life after critical illness

T2 - A qualitative phenomenological study

AU - O'Gara, Geraldine

AU - Tuddenham, Simon

AU - Pattison, Natalie

N1 - Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Haemato-oncology patients often require critical care support due to side-effects of treatment. Discharge can mark the start of an uncertain journey due to the impact of critical illness on health-related quality of life. Qualitatively establishing needs is a priority as current evidence is limited.AIMS: To qualitatively explore perceptions of haemato-oncology patients' health-related quality of life after critical illness and explore how healthcare professionals can provide long-term support.METHODS: Nine in-depth interviews were conducted three to eighteen months post-discharge from critical care. Phenomenology was used to gain deeper understanding of the patients' lived experience.SETTING: A 19-bedded Intensive Care Unit in a specialist cancer centre.FINDINGS: Five major themes emerged: Intensive care as a means to an end; Rollercoaster of illness; Reliance on hospital; Having a realistic/sanguine approach; Living in the moment. Haemato-oncology patients who experience critical illness may view it as a small part of a larger treatment pathway, thus health-related quality of life is impacted by this rather than the acute episode.CONCLUSIONS: Discharge from the intensive care unit can be seen as a positive end-point, allowing personal growth in areas such as relationships and living life to the full. The contribution of health-care professionals and support of significant others is regarded as critical to the recovery experience.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Haemato-oncology patients often require critical care support due to side-effects of treatment. Discharge can mark the start of an uncertain journey due to the impact of critical illness on health-related quality of life. Qualitatively establishing needs is a priority as current evidence is limited.AIMS: To qualitatively explore perceptions of haemato-oncology patients' health-related quality of life after critical illness and explore how healthcare professionals can provide long-term support.METHODS: Nine in-depth interviews were conducted three to eighteen months post-discharge from critical care. Phenomenology was used to gain deeper understanding of the patients' lived experience.SETTING: A 19-bedded Intensive Care Unit in a specialist cancer centre.FINDINGS: Five major themes emerged: Intensive care as a means to an end; Rollercoaster of illness; Reliance on hospital; Having a realistic/sanguine approach; Living in the moment. Haemato-oncology patients who experience critical illness may view it as a small part of a larger treatment pathway, thus health-related quality of life is impacted by this rather than the acute episode.CONCLUSIONS: Discharge from the intensive care unit can be seen as a positive end-point, allowing personal growth in areas such as relationships and living life to the full. The contribution of health-care professionals and support of significant others is regarded as critical to the recovery experience.

KW - health-related quality of life

KW - Haemato-oncology

KW - critical care

KW - post-traumatic growth

KW - phenomenology

U2 - 10.1016/j.iccn.2017.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.iccn.2017.09.011

M3 - Article

C2 - 29056247

VL - 44

SP - 76

EP - 84

JO - Intensive & critical care nursing

JF - Intensive & critical care nursing

SN - 0964-3397

ER -