University of Hertfordshire

"Her husband went away some time agoe": marriage breakdown in Presbyterian Ulster, c. 1690-1830

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"Her husband went away some time agoe": marriage breakdown in Presbyterian Ulster, c. 1690-1830. / Calvert, Leanne.

In: Women's History, Vol. 2, No. 15, 04.08.2020, p. 6-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{57144336a2894b4790e06a2ad61942d5,
title = "{"}Her husband went away some time agoe{"}: marriage breakdown in Presbyterian Ulster, c. 1690-1830",
abstract = "The history of the making and breaking of marriage in Ireland is underdeveloped, particularly for the period before the nineteenth-century. The destruction of the Public Records Office in Dublin during the Irish Civil War means that Irish historians are restricted in terms of primary sources that shed light on the history of marriage. However, other sources can supplement what has been lost: Irish Presbyterian church court records. These sources are vastly underused by Irish historians. Drawing on the minutes kept by the Irish Presbyterian church courts, this article will explore how women and men in Presbyterian Ulster negotiated the dissolution of their marriages. In doing so, it will demonstrate the rich contribution that their study can make to our knowledge of the breaking (and remaking) of marriage in Ireland.",
author = "Leanne Calvert",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The Author.",
year = "2020",
month = aug,
day = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "6--13",
journal = "Women's History",
issn = "2059-0156",
number = "15",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - "Her husband went away some time agoe": marriage breakdown in Presbyterian Ulster, c. 1690-1830

AU - Calvert, Leanne

N1 - © 2020 The Author.

PY - 2020/8/4

Y1 - 2020/8/4

N2 - The history of the making and breaking of marriage in Ireland is underdeveloped, particularly for the period before the nineteenth-century. The destruction of the Public Records Office in Dublin during the Irish Civil War means that Irish historians are restricted in terms of primary sources that shed light on the history of marriage. However, other sources can supplement what has been lost: Irish Presbyterian church court records. These sources are vastly underused by Irish historians. Drawing on the minutes kept by the Irish Presbyterian church courts, this article will explore how women and men in Presbyterian Ulster negotiated the dissolution of their marriages. In doing so, it will demonstrate the rich contribution that their study can make to our knowledge of the breaking (and remaking) of marriage in Ireland.

AB - The history of the making and breaking of marriage in Ireland is underdeveloped, particularly for the period before the nineteenth-century. The destruction of the Public Records Office in Dublin during the Irish Civil War means that Irish historians are restricted in terms of primary sources that shed light on the history of marriage. However, other sources can supplement what has been lost: Irish Presbyterian church court records. These sources are vastly underused by Irish historians. Drawing on the minutes kept by the Irish Presbyterian church courts, this article will explore how women and men in Presbyterian Ulster negotiated the dissolution of their marriages. In doing so, it will demonstrate the rich contribution that their study can make to our knowledge of the breaking (and remaking) of marriage in Ireland.

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 6

EP - 13

JO - Women's History

JF - Women's History

SN - 2059-0156

IS - 15

ER -