University of Hertfordshire

Impact of Dialysis on the Dyadic Relationship Between Male Patients and Their Female Partners

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Impact of Dialysis on the Dyadic Relationship Between Male Patients and Their Female Partners. / Moore, Currie; Skevington, Suzanne; Wearden, Alison; Mitra, Sandip.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 30, No. 3, 02.2020, p. 380-390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Moore, Currie ; Skevington, Suzanne ; Wearden, Alison ; Mitra, Sandip. / Impact of Dialysis on the Dyadic Relationship Between Male Patients and Their Female Partners. In: Qualitative Health Research. 2020 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 380-390.

Bibtex

@article{8d075c0ad2f54baa81bb1ba2a2c8fab2,
title = "Impact of Dialysis on the Dyadic Relationship Between Male Patients and Their Female Partners",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to explore the impact of three early phases of renal dialysis, namely pre-dialysis, starting dialysis, and establishing dialysis, on dyadic relationships. Twenty UK-based dyads (20 male patients and their female partners) participated in semi-structured interviews and discussed the effects of dialysis on themselves and their relationship. Dyadic thematic analysis, facilitated by dyadic-level charting, integrated participants' experiences and enabled identification of patterns across dyads. We found that dialysis had positive and negative influences on identity, social relationships, and mental health, forming the themes: Prioritizing the Patient, Carrying the Burden, and Changing Identities. The final theme, Managing the Relationship, described how dyads prevented dialysis from negatively impacting their relationship. Dyadic-level charting provided a systematic examination of individual and dyadic experiences. These findings indicate that access to informational and support services for dyads as they prepare to start dialysis may minimize negative effects on their relationship.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Interviews as Topic, Male, Mental Health, Middle Aged, Qualitative Research, Renal Dialysis/psychology, Sexual Partners/psychology, Social Identification, Social Support",
author = "Currie Moore and Suzanne Skevington and Alison Wearden and Sandip Mitra",
year = "2020",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1177/1049732319869908",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "380--390",
journal = "Qualitative Health Research",
issn = "1049-7323",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of Dialysis on the Dyadic Relationship Between Male Patients and Their Female Partners

AU - Moore, Currie

AU - Skevington, Suzanne

AU - Wearden, Alison

AU - Mitra, Sandip

PY - 2020/2

Y1 - 2020/2

N2 - The objective of this study was to explore the impact of three early phases of renal dialysis, namely pre-dialysis, starting dialysis, and establishing dialysis, on dyadic relationships. Twenty UK-based dyads (20 male patients and their female partners) participated in semi-structured interviews and discussed the effects of dialysis on themselves and their relationship. Dyadic thematic analysis, facilitated by dyadic-level charting, integrated participants' experiences and enabled identification of patterns across dyads. We found that dialysis had positive and negative influences on identity, social relationships, and mental health, forming the themes: Prioritizing the Patient, Carrying the Burden, and Changing Identities. The final theme, Managing the Relationship, described how dyads prevented dialysis from negatively impacting their relationship. Dyadic-level charting provided a systematic examination of individual and dyadic experiences. These findings indicate that access to informational and support services for dyads as they prepare to start dialysis may minimize negative effects on their relationship.

AB - The objective of this study was to explore the impact of three early phases of renal dialysis, namely pre-dialysis, starting dialysis, and establishing dialysis, on dyadic relationships. Twenty UK-based dyads (20 male patients and their female partners) participated in semi-structured interviews and discussed the effects of dialysis on themselves and their relationship. Dyadic thematic analysis, facilitated by dyadic-level charting, integrated participants' experiences and enabled identification of patterns across dyads. We found that dialysis had positive and negative influences on identity, social relationships, and mental health, forming the themes: Prioritizing the Patient, Carrying the Burden, and Changing Identities. The final theme, Managing the Relationship, described how dyads prevented dialysis from negatively impacting their relationship. Dyadic-level charting provided a systematic examination of individual and dyadic experiences. These findings indicate that access to informational and support services for dyads as they prepare to start dialysis may minimize negative effects on their relationship.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Interpersonal Relations

KW - Interviews as Topic

KW - Male

KW - Mental Health

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Qualitative Research

KW - Renal Dialysis/psychology

KW - Sexual Partners/psychology

KW - Social Identification

KW - Social Support

U2 - 10.1177/1049732319869908

DO - 10.1177/1049732319869908

M3 - Article

C2 - 31478450

VL - 30

SP - 380

EP - 390

JO - Qualitative Health Research

JF - Qualitative Health Research

SN - 1049-7323

IS - 3

ER -