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"It's nothing you could ever prepare anyone for": the experiences of young people and their families following parental stroke. / Coppock, Clare; Winter, David; Ferguson, Scott; Green, Anna.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 32, No. 4, 21.03.2018, p. 474-486.

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@article{6f0c0a7bd649482fb74559e5e57e583e,
title = "{"}It's nothing you could ever prepare anyone for{"}: the experiences of young people and their families following parental stroke",
abstract = "Aims: This study sought to explore the experiences of young people (aged 8–16) and their families following parental acquired brain injury (ABI), with the aim of developing an understanding of the ways in which members of a family make sense of events post-injury, and to consider the implications of different perspectives on adjustment and coping.Design: The study applied a qualitative approach using a thematic analysis methodology.Procedure: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 individuals from three families affected by parental stroke.Results: Findings suggested that post-injury, families experienced a period of uncertainty in which they were required to renegotiate their roles and adjust to the loss associated with parental stroke. Additionally, the psychosocial wellbeing of young people was negatively affected, whilst protective and coping strategies were recognised.Conclusions: The research offers an insight into the processes that may contribute to patterns of interpersonal relating that could negatively impact on adjustment. Provision of adequate information, psychological and practical support during recovery may therefore be crucial elements of supporting young people and their families in adjusting to the challenges posed by stroke.",
keywords = "adjustment, children, Family, psychology, stroke",
author = "Clare Coppock and David Winter and Scott Ferguson and Anna Green",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Brain Injury on 21 March 2018, available online at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699052.2018.1426879. The accepted manuscript is under embargo until 18 January 2019.",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1080/02699052.2018.1426879",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "474--486",
journal = "Brain Injury",
issn = "0269-9052",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - "It's nothing you could ever prepare anyone for": the experiences of young people and their families following parental stroke

AU - Coppock, Clare

AU - Winter, David

AU - Ferguson, Scott

AU - Green, Anna

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Brain Injury on 21 March 2018, available online at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699052.2018.1426879. The accepted manuscript is under embargo until 18 January 2019.

PY - 2018/3/21

Y1 - 2018/3/21

N2 - Aims: This study sought to explore the experiences of young people (aged 8–16) and their families following parental acquired brain injury (ABI), with the aim of developing an understanding of the ways in which members of a family make sense of events post-injury, and to consider the implications of different perspectives on adjustment and coping.Design: The study applied a qualitative approach using a thematic analysis methodology.Procedure: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 individuals from three families affected by parental stroke.Results: Findings suggested that post-injury, families experienced a period of uncertainty in which they were required to renegotiate their roles and adjust to the loss associated with parental stroke. Additionally, the psychosocial wellbeing of young people was negatively affected, whilst protective and coping strategies were recognised.Conclusions: The research offers an insight into the processes that may contribute to patterns of interpersonal relating that could negatively impact on adjustment. Provision of adequate information, psychological and practical support during recovery may therefore be crucial elements of supporting young people and their families in adjusting to the challenges posed by stroke.

AB - Aims: This study sought to explore the experiences of young people (aged 8–16) and their families following parental acquired brain injury (ABI), with the aim of developing an understanding of the ways in which members of a family make sense of events post-injury, and to consider the implications of different perspectives on adjustment and coping.Design: The study applied a qualitative approach using a thematic analysis methodology.Procedure: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 individuals from three families affected by parental stroke.Results: Findings suggested that post-injury, families experienced a period of uncertainty in which they were required to renegotiate their roles and adjust to the loss associated with parental stroke. Additionally, the psychosocial wellbeing of young people was negatively affected, whilst protective and coping strategies were recognised.Conclusions: The research offers an insight into the processes that may contribute to patterns of interpersonal relating that could negatively impact on adjustment. Provision of adequate information, psychological and practical support during recovery may therefore be crucial elements of supporting young people and their families in adjusting to the challenges posed by stroke.

KW - adjustment

KW - children

KW - Family

KW - psychology

KW - stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040993714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02699052.2018.1426879

DO - 10.1080/02699052.2018.1426879

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 474

EP - 486

JO - Brain Injury

JF - Brain Injury

SN - 0269-9052

IS - 4

ER -