University of Hertfordshire

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By the same authors

Movement speed is biased by prior experience

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Movement speed is biased by prior experience. / Hammerbeck, Ulrike; Yousif, Nada; Greenwood, Richard; Rothwell, John C; Diedrichsen, Jörn.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 111, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 128-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Hammerbeck, U, Yousif, N, Greenwood, R, Rothwell, JC & Diedrichsen, J 2014, 'Movement speed is biased by prior experience', Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 111, no. 1, pp. 128-134. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00522.2013

APA

Hammerbeck, U., Yousif, N., Greenwood, R., Rothwell, J. C., & Diedrichsen, J. (2014). Movement speed is biased by prior experience. Journal of Neurophysiology, 111(1), 128-134. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00522.2013

Vancouver

Hammerbeck U, Yousif N, Greenwood R, Rothwell JC, Diedrichsen J. Movement speed is biased by prior experience. Journal of Neurophysiology. 2014 Jan 1;111(1):128-134. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00522.2013

Author

Hammerbeck, Ulrike ; Yousif, Nada ; Greenwood, Richard ; Rothwell, John C ; Diedrichsen, Jörn. / Movement speed is biased by prior experience. In: Journal of Neurophysiology. 2014 ; Vol. 111, No. 1. pp. 128-134.

Bibtex

@article{8e7a2b52e495477893f4d10b48387bd2,
title = "Movement speed is biased by prior experience",
abstract = "How does the motor system choose the speed for any given movement? Many current models assume a process that finds the optimal balance between the costs of moving fast and the rewards of achieving the goal. Here, we show that such models also need to take into account a prior representation of preferred movement speed, which can be changed by prolonged practice. In a time-constrained reaching task, human participants made 25-cm reaching movements within 300, 500, 700, or 900 ms. They were then trained for 3 days to execute the movement at either the slowest (900-ms) or fastest (300-ms) speed. When retested on the 4th day, movements executed under all four time constraints were biased toward the speed of the trained movement. In addition, trial-to-trial variation in speed of the trained movement was significantly reduced. These findings are indicative of a use-dependent mechanism that biases the selection of speed. Reduced speed variability was also associated with reduced errors in movement amplitude for the fast training group, which generalized nearly fully to a new movement direction. In contrast, changes in perpendicular error were specific to the trained direction. In sum, our results suggest the existence of a relatively stable but modifiable prior of preferred movement speed that influences the choice of movement speed under a range of task constraints.",
keywords = "Adult, Female, Humans, Male, Motor Skills, Practice (Psychology), Task Performance and Analysis, Time Factors",
author = "Ulrike Hammerbeck and Nada Yousif and Richard Greenwood and Rothwell, {John C} and J{\"o}rn Diedrichsen",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2013 The American Physiological Society. This is an Open Access article licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution license CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. ",
year = "2014",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/jn.00522.2013",
language = "English",
volume = "111",
pages = "128--134",
journal = "Journal of Neurophysiology",
issn = "0022-3077",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Movement speed is biased by prior experience

AU - Hammerbeck, Ulrike

AU - Yousif, Nada

AU - Greenwood, Richard

AU - Rothwell, John C

AU - Diedrichsen, Jörn

N1 - © 2013 The American Physiological Society. This is an Open Access article licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution license CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - How does the motor system choose the speed for any given movement? Many current models assume a process that finds the optimal balance between the costs of moving fast and the rewards of achieving the goal. Here, we show that such models also need to take into account a prior representation of preferred movement speed, which can be changed by prolonged practice. In a time-constrained reaching task, human participants made 25-cm reaching movements within 300, 500, 700, or 900 ms. They were then trained for 3 days to execute the movement at either the slowest (900-ms) or fastest (300-ms) speed. When retested on the 4th day, movements executed under all four time constraints were biased toward the speed of the trained movement. In addition, trial-to-trial variation in speed of the trained movement was significantly reduced. These findings are indicative of a use-dependent mechanism that biases the selection of speed. Reduced speed variability was also associated with reduced errors in movement amplitude for the fast training group, which generalized nearly fully to a new movement direction. In contrast, changes in perpendicular error were specific to the trained direction. In sum, our results suggest the existence of a relatively stable but modifiable prior of preferred movement speed that influences the choice of movement speed under a range of task constraints.

AB - How does the motor system choose the speed for any given movement? Many current models assume a process that finds the optimal balance between the costs of moving fast and the rewards of achieving the goal. Here, we show that such models also need to take into account a prior representation of preferred movement speed, which can be changed by prolonged practice. In a time-constrained reaching task, human participants made 25-cm reaching movements within 300, 500, 700, or 900 ms. They were then trained for 3 days to execute the movement at either the slowest (900-ms) or fastest (300-ms) speed. When retested on the 4th day, movements executed under all four time constraints were biased toward the speed of the trained movement. In addition, trial-to-trial variation in speed of the trained movement was significantly reduced. These findings are indicative of a use-dependent mechanism that biases the selection of speed. Reduced speed variability was also associated with reduced errors in movement amplitude for the fast training group, which generalized nearly fully to a new movement direction. In contrast, changes in perpendicular error were specific to the trained direction. In sum, our results suggest the existence of a relatively stable but modifiable prior of preferred movement speed that influences the choice of movement speed under a range of task constraints.

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Motor Skills

KW - Practice (Psychology)

KW - Task Performance and Analysis

KW - Time Factors

U2 - 10.1152/jn.00522.2013

DO - 10.1152/jn.00522.2013

M3 - Article

C2 - 24133220

VL - 111

SP - 128

EP - 134

JO - Journal of Neurophysiology

JF - Journal of Neurophysiology

SN - 0022-3077

IS - 1

ER -